It is currently 13 Aug 2020, 04:11


1, 2, 3, 4  Next New Topic Add Reply
Author Message
Post 06 Feb 2011, 17:21 • #1 
Emeritus
Joined: 05/13/08
Posts: 449
Location: US-IN
Hello all, I know many tying sites have a "œWhat is in your vise"


Last edited by HouzeHead on 07 Feb 2011, 04:56, edited 1 time in total.

Top
  
Quote
Post 07 Feb 2011, 04:24 • #2 
Sport
Joined: 12/27/10
Posts: 28
I live in the Panhandle of North Idaho and I fish the Coeur D'Alene, Priest, Clearwater (for steelhead) and Pend Oreille rivers plus lots of small creeks and some of the lakes.
I don't have any pics since the digital camera broke, but I've been tying 17th century-style snelled, no-hackle winged flies lately just because they are so cool looking. I've been spending most of the winter tying up the usual suspects to fill out the boxes but I'm really getting into these old, old flies. Gonna try some out next week at Priest River.

RevGeo


Top
  
Quote
Post 17 Feb 2011, 16:56 • #3 
Guide
Joined: 08/06/09
Posts: 287
I fish in Central Oregon, mainly the middle and upper Deschutes. I have been filling my streamer box. I fished nothing but Muddlers and Wooly Buggers fron August until it was to cold to fish. My flys aren't presentation grade but they catch fish.
Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Mike


Top
  
Quote
Post 24 Feb 2011, 13:29 • #4 
FFR Founder
Joined: 06/07/05
Posts: 792
Location: US-MA
These are for Maine smallies this coming season ...
Image
Quill Minnow, Page, Round Lake

Here's a trolling streamer for Maine salmon and togue:
Image
Red Viper


Top
  
Quote
Post 24 Feb 2011, 13:45 • #5 
Glass Fanatic
Joined: 07/05/10
Posts: 5069
Location: Mid Hudson Valley of New York
Nice work FT ... I love the Red Viper and and Quill Minnow, they are way cool. What is the wing material on the Red Viper? it's beautiful.


Top
  
Quote
Post 24 Feb 2011, 13:54 • #6 
FFR Founder
Joined: 06/07/05
Posts: 792
Location: US-MA
Criscip the wing on the Red Viper is made up from gray saddle, pintail flank, lady amherst, goose fibers and ruffed grouse! Lots on that one - it's fun! Alec


Top
  
Quote
Post 24 Feb 2011, 15:01 • #7 
Emeritus
Joined: 05/13/08
Posts: 449
Location: US-IN
Great looking flies I could see the Red Viper being being an excellent wounded baitfish imitation. What is the hook size / shank length?

HH


Top
  
Quote
Post 24 Feb 2011, 15:19 • #8 
FFR Founder
Joined: 06/07/05
Posts: 792
Location: US-MA
Houzehead that's a big hook - it's a #2 10XL.


Top
  
Quote
Post 24 Feb 2011, 16:58 • #9 
Glass Fanatic
Joined: 05/09/06
Posts: 2418
Location: US
Alec that red viper is sweeet!


Top
  
Quote
Post 24 Feb 2011, 17:21 • #10 
Master Guide
Joined: 11/05/07
Posts: 358
Location: Prairieville, Louisiana
The Red Viper Rules!


Top
  
Quote
Post 17 Mar 2011, 10:29 • #11 
Master Guide
Joined: 01/11/06
Posts: 543
Location: Platte City, Missouri
Well I live up here in the PNW and primarily fish for Cutthroat (fresh & Salt), Steelhead, and Salmon (fresh & Salt). These last few years I've been able to do more bass type fishing since I met a neighbor who is from S. Carolina and owns a boat ...
My most recent outing (last week) was on the Oly Penn fishing my beloved Sol Duc for metalheads and Cutthroat.
Image

Primarily Hairwings, speys, and buggers!
Image

Then when the water is not quite like it is in the above photo ... what I call Big Uglies!
Image

Sauk River, Wa. for beautiful Dollies (primarily) and Steelhead ...
Image

and the release!

Image

Saltwater box for Cutthroat and resident Coho ...
Image

My lake selection, which isn't much, but still figuring those fisheries out ...
Image

Probably my favorite style of spey ... Glasso Speys ...
Image



Top
  
Quote
Post 27 Nov 2011, 18:42 • #12 
Master Guide
Joined: 08/03/06
Posts: 551
Location: US-OR
Harley,

where did you get your tackle bag?


Top
  
Quote
Post 28 Nov 2011, 13:06 • #13 
Sport
Joined: 04/03/07
Posts: 35
Location: US-NC Black Mountain
#20 Tricos & BWO, fishing in the Great Smoky Mtns National Park.


Top
  
Quote
Post 28 Nov 2011, 15:02 • #14 
New Member
Joined: 01/11/09
Posts: 12
Location: South West Virginia
Hare's ear soft hackles and a local stocked pond. Stocked rainbows are fun at times.


Top
  
Quote
Post 30 Nov 2011, 01:09 • #15 
Sport
Joined: 11/25/11
Posts: 78
Location: Chapel Hill, NC
Ditto on the Hare's ear soft hackles. Hare's ear do really good here on the DH sections. I've noticed some of the larger fish take the chartruse green weenie imitation I had tied on though ... interesting.

I mainly fish the Mitchell River, which is a DH river here in the upper piedmont of NC


Top
  
Quote
Post 30 Nov 2011, 01:10 • #16 
Sport
Joined: 11/25/11
Posts: 78
Location: Chapel Hill, NC
But apparently there's a shortage of hungarian partridge feathers, so tying soft hackles with "substitute" materials just doesn't work so hot.


Top
  
Quote
Post 30 Nov 2011, 13:05 • #17 
Master Guide
Joined: 01/11/06
Posts: 543
Location: Platte City, Missouri
@Boo, I ordered it online from a surplus store, I don't remember the name. I think it was Bulldog that had mentioned the store before so you might want to ask him. I does pretty good, but now that I'm back into the cold rainy season up here (winter) I think I'm going to pick up one of those messenger bags from recycled waders ...


Top
  
Quote
Post 03 Dec 2011, 14:36 • #18 
Guide
Joined: 11/10/11
Posts: 104
Location: Jura / Switzerland
[align=]My name is Romain. I was born in September 1958 and I have three children. I worked in an medical institution for elderly people. I help them in their daily lives.
I have been a flyfisherman since 1970. I live in the (French speaking) west of Switzerland (Jura). I live in 3 kilometers to a village wich is called Courfaivre or the first CDC fly was tying ... I fish mainly with artificial flies in CDC

The CDC Story
Like the famous Swiss army-knife or the healthy muesli the fluffy CDC-Fly is a genuine product of Switzerland as well. CDC is the abbreviation of "Cul de canard" which is French for "Duck's arse". Not right at the backside, but on the top of the duck's tail is the preen-gland, which oils and waterproofs the aquatic bird. Around that gland are approximately Maximilien Joset two dozen small feathers - the cdc's. They are fluffy and due to their natural impregnation absorb very little water. The cdc-feathers give a natural "live-effect" which imitates the wings of many mayflies and other insects perfectly. In contrast to the barbs of a cock-hackle the cdc-hackles have very small kinked and twisted barbules that trap air and increase floatability. It is unknown who created the first cdc-patterns.

But in 1920 the Swiss fly-tyers Maximilien Joset in Courfaivre and Charles Bickel in Valorbe tied the first small series of simple cdc-patterns to fool the smart and suspicious trout and graylings of the chalk-streams in the Swiss Jura area. The body of those flies were made of raffia or thread. The flies had no wings and just a cdc-hackle instead of a cock-hackle turned around the hook-shank in the classical way.[/align]

(Maximilien Joset pattern style) "le moustique jurassien"
Image
Image
Image

French style (Devaux patterns)
Image
Image
Image


Top
  
Quote
Post 03 Dec 2011, 14:58 • #19 
Master Guide
Joined: 08/23/10
Posts: 453
Location: San Antonio, TX
Very nice ties Romain, and welcome! It's always nice to see ties froma round this very small world we now live in (thanks to the internet). Your countrymen were really onto something with the CDC--it's a great material and will give that different but natural appearance sometimes needed.

Tying here has now entered the #16 soft hackle (black silk & Starling or Hare's Ear & Partridge) and #20-24 midges.


Top
  
Quote
Post 18 Jan 2012, 21:33 • #20 
Master Guide
Joined: 12/14/11
Posts: 974
Location: Chicago Western Suburbs
For me it's been pink squirrels, scuds, rubber legged fox squirrel nymphs, assorted softackles and Klinkhammers for trout in Wisconsin and larger rubber legged fox squirrel nymphs and Chris Helm's panfish nymphs for panfish.


Top
  
Quote
Post 16 Feb 2012, 13:00 • #21 
Sport
Joined: 02/15/12
Posts: 26
Location: Western Mass.
I've been tying up a local pattern known as a Westfield River Bug. It's basically a variation on a bead head PT nymph, and seems to be very effective in caddis and stonefly heavy streams. I like 'em big- size 8-10, dead drifted, swung, dropped below a beefy EHC- whatever works for ya! I fish mainly in Western MA and Northern NH.
Image

Hook- size 8-12 nymph or wet
Gold Bead
Tail- PT fibers
Body- green floss, wrapped over the butt ends of the tail fibers. I will often put some weight under the floss
Rib- gold or silver wire (the fish don't seem to care what color it is)
Abdomen- Peacock
Arms/Legs- PT fibers, spit by wing case
Wing Case- white antron yarn (or something similar)
Thread- I like black 6/0


Top
  
Quote
Post 16 Feb 2012, 17:45 • #22 
Guide
Joined: 01/13/12
Posts: 118
Location: US-GA
Been into wet flies lately, and furnishing my own materials ... some of the time, anyway. Here's a simple pattern, starling and purple, on a 12 wet fly hook.

Image


Top
  
Quote
Post 16 Feb 2012, 22:49 • #23 
Emeritus
Joined: 05/13/08
Posts: 449
Location: US-IN
Great flies shown thanks for posting! The starling /purple may be simple but it is lethal pattern for many species.


Top
  
Quote
Brookie Muddler
Post 08 Oct 2012, 09:37 • #24 
Sport
Joined: 07/15/12
Posts: 85
Location: US-CA
Jazzing up the old muddler for some big trout in the High SierraImage


Top
  
Quote
Post 25 Mar 2013, 14:22 • #25 
Sport
Joined: 08/07/09
Posts: 60
Location: Huntsville, AL
I will tie the Haystack and fish it in the Smoky Mountains this Spring.

Chips


Top
  
Quote
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  

1, 2, 3, 4  Next New Topic Add Reply



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Jump to:  
Google
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group