It is currently 05 Aug 2020, 10:54


New Topic Add Reply
Author Message
Avoiding epoxy footballs
Post 29 May 2020, 09:08 • #1 
Glass Fanatic
Joined: 06/10/09
Posts: 1407
Location: US-OH
Everyone develops their own techniques of covering wraps with epoxy so there isn't one correct way. My way is just something I came up with that works for me to achieve flat low build wraps. I work mostly with TM Lite but have used the same method with regular viscosity as well. Immediately after applying with a brush on a rod turner (about 10 rpm) I brace my hand on a rest and drag a small piece of index card or playing card on the wrap and it removes the excess and makes the epoxy flat and uniform thickness all around. I hold the strip of card about an inch back and use the "spring" pressure of the strip of card to apply just slight pressure. Then just wipe off the strip and use it on the next wrap. Before starting I cut several strips of different widths for the different sized guides. I use this same technique when covering the signature section using a piece of card a couple inches wide. Instead of just pulling the strip away after a revolution or two, I wipe downward to avoid a ridge. From there just proceed with hand turning or motor turning as normal.


Top
  
Quote
Post 29 May 2020, 09:41 • #2 
Glass Fanatic
Joined: 02/12/16
Posts: 3688
Location: USA-CO
Pretty clumsy card-marking job... ;)

Thanks tiptop, that's a good idea.


Top
  
Quote
Post 29 May 2020, 09:48 • #3 
Guide
Joined: 11/23/17
Posts: 180
Location: Lehigh Valley, PA
Excellent TipTop! I too am of the opinion that several low buildup (3-4) applications result in the most "level" outcome. While 3-4 applications may sound excessive at first blush, the removal of excess finish from each application can result in a narrow, level wrap that still avoids thread ridges showing at the edges of the wraps. This can be attained with regular build or lite build epoxies. Others may disagree, which makes discussions like this interesting as we all continue learning.


Top
  
Quote
Post 29 May 2020, 12:04 • #4 
Glass Fanatic
Joined: 06/10/09
Posts: 1407
Location: US-OH
I should add that I never use more than 2 coats. Also, I try to put an even light coat on and then use the strip of card to flatten and even all over. Usually no more than a drop of excess comes off - sometimes less, sometimes none. After the first coat I'll see thread texture here and there but those are covered after the second coat.


Top
  
Quote
Post 29 May 2020, 13:20 • #5 
Guide
Joined: 02/13/16
Posts: 269
Location: US-TX
This is very timely as I've been having my doubts about my epoxy job for a while. I think what has thrown me as I've read the forum over the last few years is what is meant when people say "soak the threads", or "very light coat". I guess I was thinking that meant pretty much just soak them and wipe it mostly off, where you can see quite a bit of the thread. But it sounds like I interpreted that wrong.

It also occurred to me that the issue of TM Lite drawing away from the edges and actually exposing thread (not simply footballing) seems worse with silk. So it's a finer line between not enough and too much (at least on first coat, again more with silk). But that's just a theory at this point. I'm about to do some more tests, using more on the first coat than I've been doing.


Top
  
Quote
Post 29 May 2020, 15:43 • #6 
Sport
Joined: 07/07/19
Posts: 39
Location: US-WI
Thanks tip-top. Do you have any special technique to avoid creating air bubbles when you separate the card strip from the wet wrap?


Top
  
Quote
Post 29 May 2020, 17:11 • #7 
Glass Fanatic
Joined: 06/10/09
Posts: 1407
Location: US-OH
I rarely have a bubble because the way I mix doesn't make any. If I do see a bubble, it can easily be eliminated by blowing on it gently through a straw.


Top
  
Quote
Post 29 May 2020, 19:59 • #8 
Guide
Joined: 11/23/17
Posts: 180
Location: Lehigh Valley, PA
Something that is missing from many of the comments above is the weight of the epoxy used, regardless of brand. May or may not be relevant. In my case I've been using Lite formulas. I haven't used Regular build in awhile but do recall it was good over feather inlays.


Top
  
Quote
Post 01 Jun 2020, 08:26 • #9 
Sport
Joined: 01/07/19
Posts: 50
Location: Metro Detroit
Thanks, tiptop! I will have to use this process on my next build.


Top
  
Quote
Post 03 Jun 2020, 07:34 • #10 
Master Guide
Joined: 02/04/12
Posts: 581
Location: SE Pa
PENZZZ wrote:
Something that is missing from many of the comments above is the weight of the epoxy used, regardless of brand. May or may not be relevant. In my case I've been using Lite formulas. I haven't used Regular build in awhile but do recall it was good over feather inlays.

+1. I'm not positive, but I think the Lite formulas flatten out a bit more not only because they flow better - but also because the thinning agents evaporate out, leaving less material in the end. I haven't used high build in a while, but I do think the Lites have a bit more odor as they are curing due to this evaporation.


Top
  
Quote
Post 10 Jun 2020, 20:46 • #11 
Master Guide
Joined: 02/01/12
Posts: 737
Location: Upstate NY
None of the low viscosity or “lite” build 2 part tread finish epoxies have chemicals that “evaporate”, they have reactive dilutents. Nothing off gasses from them unless you add a solvent to thin them down even more.


Top
  
Quote
Post 10 Jun 2020, 21:47 • #12 
Sport
Joined: 12/28/19
Posts: 54
I put my TML on heavy , let it rotate for a few minutes and stop rotating with the guides on top . Let it sag and wipe the bottom with a calling card and turn it back on . Done , never have put a second coat on .


Top
  
Quote
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  

New Topic Add Reply



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: preast and 5 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Jump to:  
Google
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group