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Post 26 Jun 2011, 07:46 • #1 
Master Guide
Joined: 07/18/07
Posts: 643
Location: US-NH
Here is a quick fix, not elegant but it worked for meImage, saved me the hassle to replace a new ferrule on a older rod.

No more gap
Image

Go to your fav grocery store and grab one of these baggiesImage
Cut a small piece and stretch it tight on the male section and instant gap, go fish and discard when done.
Image

Image


Last edited by kimosabe131 on 26 Jun 2011, 07:52, edited 1 time in total.

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Post 26 Jun 2011, 08:27 • #2 
Global Moderator
Joined: 04/20/07
Posts: 8281
Location: US-ME
Gosh well, I should bite my tongue, but others might get the wrong idea and overlook the basics. I get that as an emergency temporary fix, but the standard beeswax (any sewing shop) is the usual solution, and I don't see why this one would be different. As long as rod ferrules have been around (metal also) it is the standard way of snugging a ferrule. It will self fit to provide a much more even bearing surface than a stretchy pastic film. It will easily add and maintain 1/8" of gap in a spigot ferrule, more if too much is applied. It enables the ferrule to be snugly but not force fit, as the wax tends to cling to itself between the surfaces. It comes loose easily for disassembly (again, unless too much is applied and the fit is made too tight). If a ferrule can't be maintained in that way, it was either poorly maintained to begin with, poorly fit, or both, and it is going to need a repair, such as a coating of epoxy/flex-cote. If it were a new rod, I would bring the poor fit to the attention of the maker, unless I knew I was guilty of abusing the rod. But a spigot ferrule should never wear that loose if maintained to begin with. I'm not sure why the lower section the spigot is glued into isn't reinforcement wrapped, but maybe that is a new invention on an old and well proven technology. If not, that is the next spot that will need repair.

I'm sure the fix shown works, but the concern is that it won't work for long and may cause other trouble because you can't count on how the pressure of the fit will distribute itself. As a parallel, here and there folks give the advice to use a vinyl protectant like Armour-all to clean a fly line., easy, and apparantly effective at first. Well, it works great a few times, makes the line slick and it seems to work great. Until it is softened and ruined. Thus, I would use it only on a line that is already worn out and due to be repaced, but not on one that would work fine if cleaned and maintained with an appropriate product.


Last edited by whrlpool on 26 Jun 2011, 08:36, edited 1 time in total.

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Post 26 Jun 2011, 09:57 • #3 
Master Guide
Joined: 07/18/07
Posts: 643
Location: US-NH
Whrlpool, I bought this rod about 15 years ago on the Virtual Flyshop auction (VFS) and there was a gap then.
I never noticed that the male ferrule section was not wrapped/reinforced until you mentioned it.

Maybe I am a "redneck" at heart ImageImageImage it is a quick fix on an older rod


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Post 28 Jun 2011, 04:42 • #4 
Master Guide
Joined: 12/11/07
Posts: 571
Location: Driftless Area & Great Lakes Tribs
I had a rod with a similar problem and dipped the male ferrule in polyurethane spar varnish and hung it vertically (ferrule down) to dry. It put on a smooth even coat that snugged up the fit and provided the needed 1/8" gap between the two sections.


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Post 17 Oct 2021, 05:34 • #5 
Master Guide
Joined: 02/19/08
Posts: 996
Location: Branson, Missouri
BHSpey - I took your advice... and after a quick dip, the gap space has been returned to original.
Here, the rod hangs vertical drying. Thanks kindly for the tip.



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Post 17 Oct 2021, 10:29 • #6 
Guide
Joined: 06/19/14
Posts: 103
Location: Columbia, MO
I always thought spigot ferrules were supposed to have a gap. Is that wrong?

Thanks,
steve


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Post 17 Oct 2021, 12:46 • #7 
Administrator
Joined: 01/10/06
Posts: 7278
Location: Holly Springs, NC
Steve, spigot ferrules should have a gap. They should fit snugly without any movement or clicking. Just like metal ferrules, keep spigot ferrules clean. A little paraffin wax is recommended by some rod companies.

A gap of 1/8-1/4 inch is recommended, to allow for wear with time. As long as the ferrule is tight, a shorter gap is fine. But if the two rod sections touch before the ferrule is tight, the ferrule needs repair.


Tom


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Post 17 Oct 2021, 13:48 • #8 
Guide
Joined: 06/19/14
Posts: 103
Location: Columbia, MO
Thanks, Tom. That's what I remembered being told when I acquired my first glass rod with a spigot ferrule. I had never seen or heard of them, before. I was about to force them together, when I thought to ask the builder; a fortunate moment of good sense, on my part.

Thanks, again.
steve


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Post 18 Oct 2021, 09:23 • #9 
Glass Fanatic
Joined: 06/23/05
Posts: 4598
Location: US-MT
I remember as kids we would shove blades of grass in our ferrules (metal) to help secure them.....


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Post 18 Oct 2021, 21:46 • #10 
Master Guide
Joined: 04/02/14
Posts: 451
Location: US- Northern CO
didn't we have a thread about putting crazy glue on in a thin coat and wiping it off to fix this


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