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Post 14 Jan 2019, 19:25 • #51 
Glass Fanatic
Joined: 11/06/17
Posts: 1943
Location: South of Joplin
Weren't there some large arbor fly reels a hundred years ago? Indiana reels maybe? Or were those bait casting reels?


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Post 14 Jan 2019, 21:05 • #52 
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Joined: 08/10/05
Posts: 17338
Location: downtown Bulverde, Texas
actually, 3rd grade was division, not trig and analytic geometry

as I already mentioned on this thread, documented large arbor reels go back to wooden Scarborough reels in the 1840s, and of course the principal was applied on naval capstans two millennia before - in fact, Archimedes was the trig and analytic geometry guy. The people-believed-flat-earth people are way off base, not only did all civilization know the earth was round, and stated in the book of Job (6th century BC), Eratosthenes calculated the earth's diameter in 240 BC (so every place the Romans conquered knew this fact) - all he needed was two towers of known height with a known north-south separation distance, and measure the declination angles in their shadows - especially any sailor knew this fact from watching for enemy boats on the horizon.

probably the first large arbor that counts as a fly reel is JW Young Simplex, 1895
Note it was also centerpin design, same as contemporary fly reels.
(The conventional-frame Duplex salmon reel of 1893 may have had a large arbor, but no photo shows it.)
Image
right behind it, JW Young made the Coxon Aerial, 1896, which this final Young reel was styled to commemorate - and they look strikingly the same
Even the arbor here is made to evoke the spokes used for the arbor on the Coxon Aerial.
Image
interesting, Reuben Heaton had the spoked arbor and ventilated side plate patent in 1888.
Image
since they did so much business with S. Allcock Co. as well, maybe they let it slide


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Post 14 Jan 2019, 21:34 • #53 
Glass Fanatic
Joined: 11/06/17
Posts: 1943
Location: South of Joplin
4th grade then, I had pi committed to memory before we moved to Idaho when I was nine and circumference of a simple circle is not trigonometry (triangles) nor analytic geometry (not sure, isn't that graph study?) although I guess it might be handy in those studies.
I think the word problem was how many revolutions the wheel made if the wagon traveled a mile. I'm sure they no long teach arithmetic and I don't know if they still have word problems. The wheel was reinforced when I watched ranchers measure land by counting the times a flag on a truck wheel touched the ground, one guy driving and the other counting.
I guess I missed the Scarborough reel comment. I just happened to remember some picture of early 1900s reels that were mostly arbor.


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Post 14 Jan 2019, 23:30 • #54 
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Joined: 08/10/05
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Location: downtown Bulverde, Texas
I was happy to get the Coxon Aerial in there.
Found an 1896 model photo - they made these in 3", 3-1/2", and 4"
Image

and this really nice 1930 Aerial
Image Image

Here's a Young pattern 9 1937, I took fishing one day, and a different pattern 9 showing the arbor
Image Image


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Post 15 Jan 2019, 19:46 • #55 
Guide
Joined: 06/28/18
Posts: 282
Location: Bozeman, MT
I fish with reels that balance the rod in my hand...I use everything from Ross R Series reels ( R1, R2, R3), Hardy Reels (3 1/8 Perfect & Featherweight), to Abel Big Game (.5 & 1) with Fiberglass rods. My older-longer 8 1/2' & 9' rods (6 & 7 wt) do well with the Abel 1, my 3-5 wt 7' to 8 1/2' rods fish well with any of the others...with the exception of the 9' 7wt Winston rod, the others do better when there's a DT line on the reel.


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Post 17 Jan 2019, 12:02 • #56 
Guide
Joined: 10/19/17
Posts: 102
Location: West of the east and east of the west
I get the math/physics/whatever; it's just that backing on a standard arbor does the same thing, and looks better on a vintage rod. Just my opinion of course...


Last edited by Prairieschooner on 21 Jan 2019, 11:07, edited 1 time in total.

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Post 17 Jan 2019, 15:11 • #57 
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Joined: 08/10/05
Posts: 17338
Location: downtown Bulverde, Texas
no worries, we assumed you see the forest.


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Post 18 Jan 2019, 10:10 • #58 
Master Guide
Joined: 07/27/18
Posts: 361
Location: Probably at a Diner in Eastern PA
Quote:
backing on a standard arbor does the same thing,






An interesting observation about backing. That said, since a large arbor also has backing, the relative size of the arbor with respect to the fly line remains the same. also, once you really get into the backing, then the differences come through. All that is to say, that it really depends on what you are fishing for. If we are talking salt water, or large river run or lake fish, then Large arbor, because you are more likely to be fighting into backing and from the reel. If we are taking sub 20 inch fish, then its more likely to come down to hand lining without backing coming into play and the arbor won't matter


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Post 19 Jan 2019, 08:40 • #59 
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Joined: 08/10/05
Posts: 17338
Location: downtown Bulverde, Texas
I've been way-deep into the 350 yds backing on my Lamson LP3.5, which is actually a 3-3/4" standard arbor reel.
A large arbor reel is only going to hold that in the smallest diameter gel-spun (and you risk sawing through your fingers)


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Post 02 Feb 2019, 21:40 • #60 
Sport
Joined: 09/26/18
Posts: 47
Location: US-MA
I like the looks of a vintage reel, but use a large arbor fly reel because of the larger loops it stores the fly line with. I find it’s more productive to fish with.


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Post 19 Jun 2021, 06:01 • #61 
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Joined: 08/10/05
Posts: 17338
Location: downtown Bulverde, Texas
knock your lights out guys

Image


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Post 19 Jun 2021, 07:09 • #62 
New Member
Joined: 03/05/21
Posts: 18
Location: New Mexico

When I'm on a stream all day, I want a light reel with a great drag...I don't think twice about locking in a contemporary reel into an old fiberglass rod's reel seat.


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Post 24 Jun 2021, 03:49 • #63 
Guide
Joined: 03/12/15
Posts: 225
Location: US-CT
I just have to use a Medalist on my Fenwicks. The "new" reels are great but for me- it just feels right to have the retro look intact.


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Post 27 Jun 2021, 09:49 • #64 
New Member
Joined: 06/20/20
Posts: 21
Goodness me, I do sorely miss having those in English rivers.
The nearest thing we have is Shad.
And then only in a couple of rivers.


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Post 09 Jul 2021, 19:06 • #65 
New Member
Joined: 12/15/17
Posts: 24
Location: SW Idaho
Nice bump Bulldog! Get this thread into the 2020s.
I would like to point out that the drag system on fly reels only works when you are letting the spool spin. As soon as you grab the knob to turn the spool by hand the drag no longer is doing anything. If, like me, you only fish for trout, a "great drag" is not a necessity.
I use only Hardy Marquis, CFO, or Pfluegers on all my rods whether they are cane, fiberglass, or graphite, vintage or otherwise.
I have a couple of disk drag reels, they look like my clickers, but I don't like using them. I cannot look at the newer styles, I avert my eyes!


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