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Post 24 Feb 2020, 16:58 • #1 
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OK, I can make this glass-related up front because my primary inshore spinning rod for the big reel is my St. Croix Legend Glass.

The first time I took my Stradic FL4000 fishing, didn't like the large tee handle, at all - it just kept getting in the way.
(the round replacement knob doesn't grab anything except your hand)
I found a Yumeya round knob shipped from Japan for half the cost of a stock FL5000 replacement handle with the round rubber ball.
At the same time, I upgraded the inboard handle knob bushing with a BB.


I always like to carry a loaded spare spinning spool on my kayak (and a spare baitcasting reel) - never know what may happen with your line, and braid has many possible complications - both braid and XUL copolymer complications can be really compounded with night fishing.
Shopping in Japan, I found the Yumeya custom spool that matched my round knob, at a sale price competitive with the stock FL4000 spool.
It's kinda neat about '18 Stella parts interchanging with the '19 Vanqish and Stradic.
The spool is also a real upgrade, because it's better made and incorporates a spool BB where the stock Stradic spool has a bushing - admitted, only needed at blazing high-drag-load runs.
Pretty pimped...

The spool is just as blue inside - the way they did the finishing on the spool was began with the deep blue anodize, then machined the surfaces to get the 2nd gunmetal anodize.

The thing is, even though the faux-gunmetal plastic cap over the void handle screw on the unused side of the reel kinda matches, it's still plastic.
Not only that, they want $18 for the stock plastic Shimano part.
I also hate the thin rubber knob on my Vanquish UL, and was working on an order to replace that when I came across this two-piece anodized handle screw cap - also the vendor where I was probably going to order the replacement Vanquish knob.

So I began some rudimentary photoshop tinkering to see what would happen if I mixed and matched the parts from my two accent colors.
I came up with this
Fully Pimped (photoshop) beauty, and placed my order


and here's the idea, using the other two pieces to accent the blue on the Vanquish, especially with its new titanium Livre knob

From the photos I've seen, the Livre blues are darker tints than this catalog representation.
The knob I really like is the one you can't buy separate from a limited edition $300+ double handle, black/blue-flame
and even the one I ordered is a custom color combo that only Hedgehog special ordered

Kinda funny, I've seen used high-grade and pimped reels from Japan on ebay with Livre handles, and never thought they were very appetizing.
Their big handles have a following among offshore anglers on our coasts.
They also make a range of knob sizes and shapes between 24mm and the thin rubber stock knobs, which no one else seems to.
(the knob I picked is 19mm)
The more I read about advantages of metal handle grasp, the more they grew on me.
The idea behind a metal handle is they transmit more feel between the line and your fingers.
Besides, they do have their tradition...


Last edited by bulldog1935 on 19 Mar 2020, 05:17, edited 7 times in total.

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Post 24 Feb 2020, 17:07 • #2 
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Figure you'll understand and rephrase my question if need be better than I can state it. I figure, as a general principle, controls on machines shouldn't invite more force than other components of the control or the mechanism it operates will endure. So when I see oversized grips and exceptionally elongated cranks, I wonder if the grip invites cranking loads past what the rest of the mechanism can take. Essentially the same reason a lug wrench is only so long and it will slip, or the hand will, before you can overtighten a wheel nut or break a stud.

Neat pics. Neat stuff.


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Post 24 Feb 2020, 19:23 • #3 
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thanks
I understand your thought, but these 3 reels were intentionally designed for big winding loads, with oversize main gear, finer (more) gear teeth for improved gear efficiency and less free-play, extra spindle stiffness for outrageous drag loads.

Adding here, the Shimano 4000 and 5000 sizes (HG and XG high-speed gearing, the only reels imported to US) are the exact reel, same handle length (59mm), just different handle knob and spool arbor diameters for different line capacities. The FL5000 has a 39mm dia round rubber knob, vs. the 4000 flat tee, and the "small" round Yumeya knob I added is 33mm dia.

The only way you need the 5000 spool line capacity is fishing 50-lb braid inshore or 30-lb braid offshore - and adding about the HG gearing - if you want lower-speed gearing on any Japanese reels these days, you have to search the Japan market for model gear options. https://www.jpfishingtacklenews.com/new ... uish-2019/
I also decreased line capacity with my PE1520 spool (v stock FL4000 PE2020 and FL5000 PE3020), and I still have 275 yds or so 15-lb braid on the new spool.
Something else about this set-up, it should out-cast any reel I've ever owned.


This is the 3rd variation of this design since 2007. The three price points are differentiated by the manufacturing cost of the MOCs - titanium and wear proof stainless at the top end (Stella) - plasma-coated aluminum wear parts, magnesium or aluminum bodies and a spattering of bushings v. ball bearings in the lower 2 grades.
They capitalized on the lightweight drive parts on the mid-grade Vanquish using magnesium body and frame (and beauty anodize), titanium bail, to end up with the lowest drive inertia of any reel made.

And this light reel counts among the high-grade super reels.
My big Stradic FL4000 has been reviewed as the best $400 reel you can buy, but it's a $200 reel.

I'll never use anywhere near the 24-lb drag capacity of the big reel, fishing 15-lb braid with a 3-1/4-lb drag set by spring balance.
For me, it's mostly about comfort holding and working the thing for a half day in the saddle - optional ways to grasp the grasp (or simply palm it), e.g., hook the skinny part between your fingers, and never a need to pinch it.
Shotguns and (fly) reels are jewelry for men.


Last edited by bulldog1935 on 11 Mar 2020, 08:15, edited 5 times in total.

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Post 24 Feb 2020, 19:24 • #4 
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Thanks for posting, great information for another reel tinkerer here.


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Post 25 Feb 2020, 12:45 • #5 
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You're welcome - so far, Plat has the best Yumeya and stock Shimano parts prices. Hedgehog doesn't have the very best prices, but offers a much wider range of suppliers.
Hedgehog is also a tougher website to navigate, but once you figure your way around and how their search algorithm works, they're a very good place for wider information, applications, specs, instructions, plus they manufacture their own parts, such as the handle cap screw I'm using.

(Shimano A on the left, which is every handle they make except offshore sizes, Shimano B on the right)

Any time you're looking at Japan-market spool capacities, you need this "Gou" unit conversion table - also denoted sometimes using the #-sign
It's also the PE number you see marked on spools and even rods.
https://www.jpfishingtacklenews.com/new ... line-size/
They give a working estimation in the article that 10x the # is a working braid strength.

In the case of my PE 1520 spool, thats approximately 15-lb braid, 200 m, though I mentioned I loaded 275 yards in the brand I used.


Even this Korean rod, on the PE line, the Japanese kana at the end is Gou.
Image Image


Last edited by bulldog1935 on 26 Feb 2020, 18:43, edited 1 time in total.

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Post 25 Feb 2020, 13:17 • #6 
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Thanks, bulldog. Kinda figured those were built through and through as to cranks, grips, and so on. Was wondering if, taken by their looks and apparent ease, someone could install such parts on a reel that wasn't strong enough otherwise. Forgive me, the thought goes back to the 1960s, when a kid with a cheap reel like a Mitchell 304--stock, without any oversize grip or crank--could wind the gears out of that thing in a summer two.


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Post 28 Feb 2020, 07:35 • #7 
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I fished through a Mitchell 300 in four years catching fall spanish macks, sometimes doubles, off the jetties as a teenager.
First thing I did was shear the aluminum pin on the short 300 handle, and replaced it with the longer torpedo-grasp 400 handle.
I still have the reel, but it sounds like a freight train. But if you look at the main gear and nylon transfer gear (they added for quiet) combined with size of the teeth and freeplay in them, it's no wonder they brinnelled from high loads.
Even my Penn 4400 SS has an upside-down cone wind result on it from spindle deflection caused by catching even more and bigger mackerel in the 90s.
Neither of those reels, of course, could deliver more than a few pounds drag (the Penn an edge over the Mitchell).
But double-digit drag on a spinning reel is amazing when you consider the complexity of the mechanism, combined with the leverage of that long oscillating spindle.
Shimano and Daiwa both have decades of big offshore spinning reels under their belts now, and the drive to compete with each other.

I'm blown away by the line control on new reels - the ability to fill the spool to the brim, without wind knots falling off left and right. The high-grade reels do it with the same line control mechanism as a baitcaster - worm gear drive, in this case on the oscillating spindle shaft. The reason I bought my first Stradic, and won't be my last, was a reel takedown youtube by Tackle Advisers. He showed how precise was the Shimano reverse at each end of oscillation (measured by impact sound dB), and noted the result was better on this $200 reel than on Daiwa's very-close-second line control even on their $400 and $800 reels.
But this example of flat line-lay on my Stradic is both after 4 days' fishing and on a deeper spool.

And next to it, another kudo for Tica. They get long spool oscillation and very good line control using their improvements on eccentric gear oscillation, especially for a $95 reel.
Though Tica has a Great, non-fading and fine-adjusting drag, I wouldn't push their spindle to double-digit loads, mostly considering how that load levers on internal drive parts (though Tica has also made their mark in offshore reels). And while the Tica Libra is very smooth, and Next Level computer design and balance over the Mitchells and Penns we remember, don't expect it to feel like the 3rd generation of Shimano's super reel (which again astounds at Stradic's price point).

Note you don't see this combination of long spool and worm drive in any other reels in Shimano's line except the Stella/Vanquish/Stradic - though that will probably change beginning this year - more improved models - the Stradic not only competes with Daiwa, but with Shimano's own higher-priced Sustain. The next Sustain will probably be able to wear my blue Yumeya spool.
The last generation Stradic, a great reel, is more than edged by increased spool travel and design strength improvements in the '19 Stradic (re-make of the top-line '18 Stella).
I think the Stradic $200 price point has sent Daiwa back to the drawing board and we'll be seeing a great competing model from them in the next year or so. Right now, it's resulted in big sale prices from Daiwa. There are also great buys on '15 Stradic FK close-out inventory, which is their 2nd gen worm-drive, same lightweight metal frame and balanced rotor.
Part of the way they balance the rotor is by putting the line roller with its reinforcement on one side, and the bail return spring on the other. No one else has apparently thought of this.


Last edited by bulldog1935 on 11 Mar 2020, 08:30, edited 3 times in total.

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Post 29 Feb 2020, 08:56 • #8 
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Moving to round bait reels, a reel I bought for inshore casting a half-dozen or so years ago, and learned to hate the first time I fished it as back-up - the Tica Caiman.
It has the same type mechanism as the old Abu - the flier moves during the cast, making it not a good distance reel with inshore lures.
Hating to waste what was good about this reel, decided it could make an offshore trolling/jigging reel (and read reviews it works well there).
Like any good offshore trolling reel, it has an optional clicker on the backplate that wakes you up when it's paying drag.

I hunted down a good, inexpensive, very lightweight, 15-50-lb Jigging World spiral wrap rod, spooled the reel with 300 yds 20-lb braid + 100-yds Blue Label 20-lb fluoro.
First tried the jigging handle Tica sells on their Striper variant of the round LW, but the long arm is stainless steel, and weighs another reel. It puts a terrible torque on your hand when holding the rod.
On ebay last spring, managed to find this last red example, and only 7x4mm example I could find, of weightless graphite/EVA knob, Basszone (Thailand), 7mm Tica/Shimano/Abu handle slot, and very happy with the light weight this long handle gives to the niche combo. This looked like a worthwhile $30 upgrade (though I have been drooling over the $200 Livre handles I definitely won't be buying).

This year discovered an even better handle for this application, that lets me dial in a shorter 60mm handle pitch rather than being stuck at 75mm. Note also these employ the same 4mm knob spindle as Shimano-A and Daiwa-S, making swapping to different handle knobs a snap. The 60mm handle pitch will also work better with the moderate 5.2 gear ratio.

This isn't the $100 Japan version, but the $20 Gomexus version from Malaysia. Though it looks like a damn-good copy of Studio Composite. I also noticed Gomexus makes their aluminum copy of my 19mm Livre titanium handle knob, so there are cost-effective alternatives out there, if you're not pimping your high grade super reel.
So what to do if you end up with a couple spare handles? - if you need, can cannibalize them for standard shims, bushings and stainless ball bearings.


Last edited by bulldog1935 on 12 Mar 2020, 07:46, edited 2 times in total.

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Post 02 Mar 2020, 08:20 • #9 
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whrlpool wrote:
Figure you'll understand and rephrase my question if need be better than I can state it. I figure, as a general principle, controls on machines shouldn't invite more force than other components of the control or the mechanism it operates will endure. So when I see oversized grips and exceptionally elongated cranks, I wonder if the grip invites cranking loads past what the rest of the mechanism can take. Essentially the same reason a lug wrench is only so long and it will slip, or the hand will, before you can overtighten a wheel nut or break a stud.

Neat pics. Neat stuff.

Backing up to another thing to consider in your question that I didn't address before - gear ratios.
Reel gear ratios can vary from 4:1 to over 8:1.
20" pick-up/handle-rev to over 40".
Lower-speed gears have the leverage built into the gears, and don't benefit as much from long handles as do high-speed gears, though a large knob is still helpful for transferring power.

As I mentioned, Shimano USA only imports HG and XG gear models, and my Stradic FL4000 happens to be one of those 40"/rev reels.
I also have one model 8.3:1 baitcaster that picks up 35"/rev.
For big fish on high speed reels, you need the greater leverage a long handle provides.
But also for retrieving lures, the larger circumference you're making in each rev has the effect of slowing you down, and gives you more finesse on your lure retrieve.
I decided there's something I can do to help that baitcaster that's also going to work out well, swapping parts for another application...


Last edited by bulldog1935 on 07 Mar 2020, 07:58, edited 1 time in total.

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Post 08 Mar 2020, 15:41 • #10 
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works



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Post 10 Mar 2020, 05:10 • #11 
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Here's the Lew's baitcaster I wanted to slow down - 8.3:1, 35" pick-up /rev
It's a Super Duty G XHF (extra high speed gears), my first ever low-profile baitcaster, spool big enough for inshore with 12-lb fluoro, and found a great price on ebay.
It came with flat 1" paddles, 50mm pitch.

This is the same pitch handle on my other two Lews, both with 6.8 gears and 28" pick-up.

I slowed this one down and beefed it up with a 60mm-pitch jigging handle (the pitch is selected between 55 and 60 mm when you install, and can swap around later if I prefer).

The handle came with a 37mm knob, which I replaced with a 24mm knob - both knobs have a nice polygon shape (octagon and pentagon), which is easy to grab -
plan to use the nice 37mm knob on inexpensive carbon handle on the actual offshore jigging reel...
Probably wouldn't have done this without the extra knob justification, but I'm looking forward to trying the Lew's on the flats.


Last edited by bulldog1935 on 11 Mar 2020, 09:34, edited 1 time in total.

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Post 12 Mar 2020, 07:37 • #12 
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ok, last installment - the offshore jigging/trolling reel.
The Very inexpensive graphite handle with cheap knob from China. The handle is great, weightless and stiff to being monolithic.
(the Basszone graphite handle that I removed has pretty bad lateral flex, and just might break with offshore fish)
The Gomexus graphite handle let me select the 60mm pitch I wanted on this 5.2-geared reel, and the big knob for harder cranking (jacks, mackerel, snapper).
The 39mm die-cast and machine-finished pot metal knob that came on this cheap great handle has to weigh 40 grams, and the second stupidest knob I've ever seen (next only to Tica's stainless steel Striper handle).

Again, it's a perfect Shimano A swap (while the Basszone handle in previous photos is Shimano B).
The 37mm titanium knob that I removed from the Livre jigging handle and installed here weighs a shocking 14g (used the handle on the Lew's with a different smaller knob).
Everything I was trying to accomplish on the two bait reels.

Hard to get even lighting it to show, but both Livre and Gomexus anodizing exactly match the color of the Tica reel
(while the Basszone color was lighter with more orange)
Still one more little thing to do here - a parts order with some nice sealing clear-plastic spinning spool cans (perfect for kayak hold stash in a net bag) - the order included an M7 titanium handle nut for this reel - just helping to keep the torsion from cantilevered mass down for jigging light feel, which this powerful light-in-hand rig deserves.
One last ps - if Livre parts pique your interest, TackleJapan has discounted prices.


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Post 28 Mar 2020, 19:45 • #13 
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ok, let's then say I'm done with handles.
I never liked the apparent gawdy of Livre handles, but especially after fishing two of them last weekend, I'm sold on their function - things like dialing in your pitch, and the feel of the knobs.

The next brings to mind maybe the only good dialogue from the movie North Dallas 40.
"Wait, I haven't gotten to the weird part." "The Weird part ?!!?" "Yeah, it gets weird."
What on earth is the purpose of a Japanese reel stand.
OK, they say it's to protect the reel frame and bail when you lay your rod down.

https://www.hedgehog-studio.co.jp/page/146
If you look this up, note there are different spinning reel handle attachment designs and threads, which need different matching reel stand attachment.

But it can also work as a hook keeper, line stopper and reel balancer.

The hook keeper function is pretty obvious here - in fact, two to three ways to grab different-sized hooks.
The the two O-rings form a line stopper. You can also remove the outer portion if you want it shorter.
This one is made by Dress and called the Origin.
Here's the shortened version, used on the smaller Tica SX1500
as line stopper....................and hook keeper

But this Hedgehog Type C was so cool matching the Tica accent orange anodize, I returned the Dress Origin to its original length and application on the larger reel.
At first didn't think this was going to fit, because it bound on the reel frame. But I had 3mm nylon shims that came with the Origin - one of those and a No. 6 nylon washer I already had around made the perfect shim.


I've already exclaimed I had no use for this,
at least, until I fished one last weekend, kayaking with a rod that had no other type of hook keeper, rigged with a lure that had plenty of hooks to keep.
Here's the Livre version, which has spring-tensioned weights inside you can add/adjust to balance and offset the handle weight.

The line stopper let me paddle with the UL rod loaded with PINS minnow and its two treble hooks, out of sight, out of mind, and out of worry.
It was easy to grab it and deploy the lure and line to fish, and easy to put it away again.
The line stopper function works particularly well with braid, and is easy to adjust the tension of the braid on either side of the stopper.
Image

And one more design to show here that I thought was cool - The President made by Tsubaki
It has an obvious rotating hook keeper, and a stack of o-rings for a versatile line stopper function.

The two stands I show on my reels above are both "assigned" to rods that don't have hook keepers, and I can think of 6 other rods I own that don't have hook keepers - two of them full-time rigged in a rod rack.
But it's easy enough moving these around and swapping the simple matching handle screw caps along the way.

OK, received this and it's too cool, with a rotating hook keeper, and 4 or 5 choices on line stopper -
- offshore Halco C-Gar surface walker, and exactly how I wanted to use this


Last edited by bulldog1935 on 15 Apr 2020, 16:12, edited 5 times in total.

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Post 28 Mar 2020, 22:20 • #14 
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bulldog1935 wrote:
What on earth is the purpose of a Japanese reel stand.

I can't decide if that is the most extraneous piece of gear I've ever seen - or utterly brilliant. I think I'm leaning to the latter. It's easy to implement with most modern spinning reels too.


Tom


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Post 30 Mar 2020, 06:20 • #15 
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Tom, what surprised me fishing with it was that, unlike the big flat tee handle knob that began this process, the reel stand doesn't get in the way, interfere, or grab anything, except the line or hook you want it to grab.


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Post 06 Apr 2020, 08:23 • #16 
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I find myself with more time to tinker, but less toys to do it with, because Chicago US Customs seems to be under-staffed and running a week behind.
I'll confess while Japan slept, I grabbed a Yamaga Blanks 83 TZ Nano from Eriko's This Just In inventory (the other 8 newly stocked Yamaga rods sold by noon the next business day).

I also added a Japan market Stradic C2000SHG from Asian Portal. It's the identical reel as the US-market Stradic FL1000HG, but $50 cheaper (including express mail).
https://www.jpfishingtacklenews.com/new ... tradic-19/

My plan is increase the handle pitch with a Livre Union 45-51 (effectively slowing down the reel), but that's one of my parts stuck in customs.
The reel order also included my preferred swap-out knob.
So with a bit of tinkering, here's the new Stradic UL partially pimped for its new role on the Black Hole Rockfish UL


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Post 05 May 2020, 11:32 • #17 
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My International Express Mail lost to Canada arrived after 6 weeks.
The Livre Union counterbalanced spinning handle is da bomb.
This is the 45-51 (handle pitch in mm), and I have it set to max.
It couldn't feel more natural on this fast HX reel, the leverage it gives eliminates any hint of start-up inertia and, I guess not surprisingly, in spite of the extra 15 g, the counter balance greatly reduces the winding stop inertia.
For the first time I understand why the Japanese like double handles on spinning reels.
(though I prefer the long pitch this single counterbalanced handle gives me)


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Post 05 May 2020, 18:36 • #18 
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Very Cool, my C2000 hasn't left Japan yet!


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Post 06 May 2020, 12:08 • #19 
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take heart - my EMS Post that sat idle in Chiba for exactly 4 weeks is being delivered tomorrow - it's got some really cool hook keepers to add to the Livre balancers, along with the second Livre balancer and knob - you see the Stradic got the blue, and Vanquish is going gold to match my new Yamaga rod.

should have some good photos soon...

...ok, back the next day
Hook keeper at work



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Post 21 May 2020, 11:12 • #20 
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whrlpool wrote:
Figure you'll understand and rephrase my question if need be better than I can state it. I figure, as a general principle, controls on machines shouldn't invite more force than other components of the control or the mechanism it operates will endure. So when I see oversized grips and exceptionally elongated cranks, I wonder if the grip invites cranking loads past what the rest of the mechanism can take. Essentially the same reason a lug wrench is only so long and it will slip, or the hand will, before you can overtighten a wheel nut or break a stud.

Neat pics. Neat stuff.

Steve, ran across this and thought you'd like to see it.
It's a Daiwa chart for RCS handle application on their reel sizes.

·● can be mounted.
·△ can be mounted, it does not recommend use because excessive burden on the gears and bearings is applied.

Again, low speed reels don't gain as much from a longer handle, and actually get slowed down even further - they benefit more from shorter double or counter-balanced handles.
High-speed reels gain leverage and better finesse with longer handles.


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Post 28 May 2020, 16:25 • #21 
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Finally got my C2000, it's a fine piece of machinery for sure, let the "pimpin" begin! Probably will get a bearing kit and a stand first. Wondering what line to adorn it with. 100yds. of four pound is all it wants, or maybe 150 already forgot. I will have to get used to no anti-reverse, and the bail does not like to close automatically, I only close manually anyway. My off hand cradles and feathers the line coming off the spool till the right moment when I ease the bail back. I
The reel feels a bit on the heavy side to me, but balances some of my longer rods, pictured is a bass pro 7 foot microlite, the hardware definitely does not match but functionally it suits the reel. The other rod pictured is somebody's custom 7 footer well built with quality components, found at a flea market for cheap.
I have the C2000 pictured alongside my Soare Ci4 500S for size comparison. It will be hard to put down my 4 1/2 to 5 1/2 foot rods paired with the Soare. I mainly fish these small creeks, but I do get on bigger creeks and rivers and feel this reel will prevail eventually.








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Post 29 May 2020, 17:34 • #22 
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of course they switched to DHL right after your order, and DHL is so quick with Cincinnati as their US Customs hub.
Your creek looks very much like Cibolo here.
Also like both your reels - thanks for posting photos.
One thing to keep in mind, you need a C-2 stand for the small Shimano's - there's not enough thread available to grab a C-1 common Shimano/Daiwa.

Yes, with my salt XUL, I'm after either very low gears or very long handles.
Something I've discovered with longer handles is how nice counterbalance functions.
I would think on your low speed Stradic C2000S, a lightweight double handle would be great, short pitch (40 mm x2, or even shorter).
The gears give you all the leverage you need, the double (or counterbalance) reduces inertia, spins quickly very well, and gravity on the handle never pulls in line when you don't want it.

Here's how my low-geared Vanquish C2000S ended up with a 42-mm-pitch counterbalanced handle.
And that's a Yumeya F6 spool with about 200 yards. Again, set up to cast distance on the long UL rod, and handle big fish.
My magnesium Vanquish spool is my loaded spare to share between Stradic C2000SHG and the Vanquish - both take S-27 spool.


And still about the Vanquish, it is freakishly low-inertia. Takes a breath to turn it and a thought to stop it dead.
Have it matched with my super-sensitive, extra-long (8'3"), extra-fast, extra-light (75 g) wonder rod for long-distance shore fishing.
It matches all the lures and rigs we fish at Arroyo, and should send them out an extra 30% farther than even our other 7'6" XUL rockfish rods.


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Post 05 Jun 2020, 20:49 • #23 
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Location: US-MO
I mounted the my new reel on the two seven foot rods I had and They cast "alright" I was just not comfortable with the longer rods and they weren't giving me any extra distance. To my delight this reel balanced out perfectly on my also new 5'3" Blue Current rod and it casts a 32oz. jig further than any other setup I have. It also balanced out every other ultra light I tried it on from 4'6" to 6 footers



Thanks to Ron who had some extra pimping parts he sold to me, they make the reel function better and look great. I also ordered a bearing kit to replace the plastic bushings with. My plain little Stradic is almost able to hang with the Big Boys, Vanquish and Stella.








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Post 06 Jun 2020, 08:13 • #24 
Piscator
Joined: 08/10/05
Posts: 16289
Location: downtown Bulverde, Texas
serious tinkering - here are all the bushings that can be upgraded on the Stradic:
Spool Shaft Support bearing (upgrade bushing)
Oscillating Slider bearing + (2) washers (upgrades bushing)
Rear Worm Shaft bearing + (1) washer (upgrades bushing)
Inboard handle knob bearing (upgrades bushing)
Great job.

The YB Blue Current III is stunning to look at, and glad to hear it casts with the same shock and awe.
What line are you using?
Thanks for posting great photos.

While I'm posting, here's my surprising Tica Libra SL2500 - also got the worm shaft bushing and handle knob bushing upgrades for total 12 BB.
It came with the oscillating slider and 2 spool shaft support BB. Though it's 1.4 oz heavier than Stradic.

Loaded with Florida Distance 10-lb braid - ok, it also got a hand-worked nylon spool shim to get that wind result.

First two photos show the inexpensive but very well made Gomexus (type C) reel stand -

- the others show the final form with a Daiwa RCS handle upgrade + IOS hexagonal handle shaft necessary for this application, and Livre forte knob.

And of course it's not going on anything as exotic as Yamaga Blanks, but will share a spot between Takamiya LM79T rockfish UL and Falcon Open Hook Special ML
That's kind of the beauty of 10-lb braid, small enough diameter to fish UL, but strong enough to fish ML - just set drag differently for the two rods.

The Takamiya 76S XUL is going to get the Libra SX1500, but more later, parts in the mill...


Last edited by bulldog1935 on 06 Jun 2020, 09:37, edited 1 time in total.

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Post 06 Jun 2020, 09:22 • #25 
Guide
Joined: 03/08/14
Posts: 185
Location: US-MO
I picked this line up here local, give it a try.

Had to dig deep into the reel for this last bearing upgrade, not for the faint of heart, I am approaching the 1000 reel mark of servicing reels, but have only worked on a handful of Stradics


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