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Post 14 Apr 2021, 12:25 • #1 
Master Guide
Joined: 04/25/16
Posts: 927
Location: Rocky Mountains - Colorado
So I have fly rods that I just have but don't use...that said, I don't have a fly rod that I wouldn't use if the situation called for it. When I got into this I started with Fenwick Glass an FF805...it developed to the 2 digit older Fenwick rods. I have more than I need, so its a collection.

I then heard about Phillipsons...I am a Denver boy, and Phillipson started here in Denver...I sometimes when I am out drive by the old factory building...yup its still there. I also sometimes go to see Rick at Rick's Rods, the current owner of the Phillipson name and the remaining stock. So I wound up with some Phillipsons all from the Denver production eras.

I also have a few Wright McGill/Eagle Claw rods, also produced in Denver. That is about it...I have owned some other brands but these 3 are all I search for when looking at the auction sites and in pawn shops and antique stores.

I see some of you specialize and some have very broad interests as far as numbers of brands.

Truth be told I get almost as much pleasure out of the finding and collecting of the gear as I do catching fish.


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Post 14 Apr 2021, 18:25 • #2 
Guide
Joined: 08/23/19
Posts: 200
Location: North Central Oregon
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Truth be told I get almost as much pleasure out of the finding and collecting of the gear as I do catching fish.



I agree and will add this. I get pleasure finding an old bamboo or glass rod that has seen better days and refurbishing those rods, and when I take it out fishing after its been made "new" again, thats pleasure.
Bruce


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Post 17 Apr 2021, 12:29 • #3 
Glass Fanatic
Joined: 09/18/09
Posts: 4997
Location: Washington DC Region
Fenwicks and Phillipsons are a good intro. The rod models are fairly stable and easy to research?

Cortlands, Conolons and Wonderrods are a fun experience because they arrive and you're not quite sure what you get until you take it out to the back yard and put a line on it. They are less expensive, but you end up with quite a few.

Heddons are a world unto their own.

Yes, collecting is fun, but eventually you run out of room. I have been settling down to only collecting Fenwicks and Phillipsons. ... for the most part.


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Post 17 Apr 2021, 19:38 • #4 
Glass Fanatic
Joined: 06/09/05
Posts: 2221
Location: US-CO
The Browning Silaflex rods are terrific rods, and the line is not so extensive that you can't find them....if your hands are large enough to be comfortable with the largish grips. Back in the day, they sold for twice what the Fenwicks did, and I'm told they were S-glass.


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Post 17 Apr 2021, 19:50 • #5 
Master Guide
Joined: 04/25/16
Posts: 927
Location: Rocky Mountains - Colorado
I have owned 2 beautiful Browning rods. Purchased from 2 members here. I didn't mind the grips, even though I do have short stubby fingers. I just decided I could grab a few more Phillipsons if I sold the Brownings...so off they went.


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Post 17 Apr 2021, 20:08 • #6 
Administrator
Joined: 01/10/06
Posts: 7056
Location: Holly Springs, NC
I've heard the association of the Silaflex rods with S-glass also, but I can't find any evidence for it in the Browning catalogs. As far back as the mid-50s, Pacific Laminates (the owner before Browning) used a similar high-pressure curing process as Don Green used at Grizzly (Grizzly made the Fenwick blanks and eventually became part of the Fenwick conglomerate). Browning made a big deal about their pressure curing, but never once mentions the modulus of the fiberglass. Still, at their peak Pacific Laminates/Browning made nice rods on really good blanks.

When Fenwick brought out their S-glass material, Fenglass, they made a big deal about it in the catalogs (used in the Lunker Stik). Those same catalogs don't indicate Fenwick used S-glass for fly rods, except for the big FF9012 blank. Like Silaflex their are many suggestions that late model Fenwick fly rods were made of S-glass. In the same way, Lamiglas made a big deal about their S-glass lineup (and they DID make fly rods with the new material).


Tom


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