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Beginner with questions
Post 30 Jun 2020, 20:05 • #1 
Guide
Joined: 06/25/20
Posts: 115
Location: Easton, PA
I've fished most of my life but have only been FF for a year. Shame.......I love it, 61 now. There are questions I have. Some that haven't been asked for fear of seeming petty, but here we go:
1) are most or all fishing rods, particularly fiberglass rods, shaped to bend equally in all directions or is a stiffer and lighter side?
2) Is the word parabolic still in use and if so are most or all fiberglass rods still so?
3) If I bought an older rod, perhaps a lesser priced antique or vintage rod for everyday use, would the wrappings continue to hold up?
4) If I find a rod that I like and it needs re-wrapping what would it cost and would it ruin the collectors value?
5) not that I particularly care but will your laugh If I show up at your fishing hole with my beloved snake guides? :) ;)


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Post 30 Jun 2020, 22:08 • #2 
Administrator
Joined: 01/10/06
Posts: 6726
Location: Holly Springs, NC
Baron wrote:
...here we go:

  1. are most or all fishing rods, particularly fiberglass rods, shaped to bend equally in all directions or is a stiffer and lighter side? - a tubular rod will bend equally in all directions, but there is always a slightly stiffer side called a spine. That is a consequence of how they are made. The best rods have barely any spine.
  2. Is the word parabolic still in use and if so are most or all fiberglass rods still so? - yes, parabolic is still used. However, not all glass rods are 'parabolic'.
  3. If I bought an older rod, perhaps a lesser priced antique or vintage rod for everyday use, would the wrappings continue to hold up? - They should. Old wrappings that are just starting to fray can be given some fresh finish to make them last another 50 years. Two-three coats of spar varnish should do.
  4. If I find a rod that I like and it needs re-wrapping what would it cost and would it ruin the collectors value? - the cost depends whether you do it yourself or find someone to do the work. If a rod is beat up enough to really need re-wrapping, the collector's value is mostly gone. Besides, these are glass rods. Fish them.
  5. not that I particularly care but will your laugh If I show up at your fishing hole with my beloved snake guides? - that depends. If they are large pythons or copperheads I will probably run.


Tom


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Post 30 Jun 2020, 22:26 • #3 
Glass Fanatic
Joined: 06/23/05
Posts: 4282
Location: US-MT
Old glass rods generally are a good fit for old fishermen (like me)

Welcome. Nice old rods are dirt cheap and will really get er done. Go for it. Ask lots of questions too, it make us feel important :)


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Post 01 Jul 2020, 22:01 • #4 
Guide
Joined: 06/25/20
Posts: 115
Location: Easton, PA
I like the slower action of glass but it does seem heavier. I'm in a heavy learning cure and there will be lots of questions coming.
Do I want Parabolic?


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Post 02 Jul 2020, 01:02 • #5 
Administrator
Joined: 01/10/06
Posts: 6726
Location: Holly Springs, NC
Baron wrote:
Do I want Parabolic?

Probably. Parabolic rods are a good, happy medium. The deep, full flexing rods take some acclimation after learning to cast with graphite.

Don't try to learn it all at once. Take your time and enjoy.


Tom


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Post 02 Jul 2020, 04:52 • #6 
Glass Fanatic
Joined: 06/10/09
Posts: 1407
Location: US-OH
"Do I want parabolic?"

I wouldn't worry about it because even experienced fly fishers have a hard time defining or agreeing what parabolic in fly rod action means. Most fly rods are not parabolic, they are progressive. Very few are true parabolic but some might be called semi-parabolic. There are many more important things to learn as a beginner.


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Post 02 Jul 2020, 06:44 • #7 
Piscator
Joined: 08/10/05
Posts: 16311
Location: downtown Bulverde, Texas
A progressive taper loads a band that moves down the rod as more line is going out and the rod is doing more work - this makes it more forgiving and more accurate.
Fisher and Winston graphite is the perfect type progressive - agreeing with tiptop, most rods are going to fit here and are probably most desirable for most fishing.
The para taper loads more of the total rod length as more line is going out and the rod is doing more work - this makes it less forgiving and more powerful, especially in shorter rods.
Sage RPLX and TCR is the type para graphite - Harnell, especially in shorter rods is the most para I've found in vintage glass.
All working rod tapers combine elements of each and, especially, most para tapers add progressive tips.
Somewhere in between is the wet fly taper, which is deep flexing and surprisingly powerful (for those who are willing to wait for it) - wet fly tapers feel "swoopy" especially in longer rods, because they flex from end to end - the best type I can think of is Heddon cane, but there should be many examples in glass (the best example I can think of is my Japanese Axisco).


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Post 02 Jul 2020, 08:50 • #8 
Guide
Joined: 06/25/20
Posts: 115
Location: Easton, PA
I just had an inexpensive Daiwa rod and although it was light I was not happy with the casting. pinched it btwn the boat and dock, dang it, crushed it. The tip seemed real fast and you either got the cast right or plop. There was no loading if I understand the term correctly.

Brought home a $35 7/8wt Eagle Claw, 8' yesterday. I loaded on 8wf Cortland All-purpose and it dry casts nicely, forgivingly, but you do have to wait. This is going to be my swamp rod and will yank streamers through the Pads and weed beds.

I can only think that the higher quality glass rods must be very nice. Will be keeping my eyes open in fly shops for Fenwich and TFO products. I hope that shows open again this winter so I can handle some of the things to kind of "get my bearings". I was thinking an old FF80 might be nice.


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Post 02 Jul 2020, 08:55 • #9 
Glass Fanatic
Joined: 06/16/05
Posts: 1986
Location: Georgia
I wouldn’t get a rod marketed as parabolic until you know that’s what you want. I have rods that are definitely parabolic, some sternly progressive, some marked semi-parabolic, and most undesignated. Basically, I could describe almost all of them as some version of fast to slow progressive until you get to the parabolics; although I can see what the designers meant when saying semi-parabolic, it pretty much goes out of mine when fishing. The real parabolics are a different kettle of fish, and often require remembering that on the stream. Be aware that some of the uncertainty of what constitutes parabolic means that many will apply the term to any deep flexing rod, and you might like that action, so I wouldn’t steer away from “deep” of “slow” rods because of the above recommendation; I just wouldn’t suggest a rod designed as parabolic to a beginning fly fisherman.

What kind of fishing do you do? In vintage, 8 ft 6 wt is good general spot, with a lot of options. Shorter and maybe lighter are often used by trout fishermen here, and at the moment there seem to be a number of good deals on such rods on our for sale board.


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Post 02 Jul 2020, 11:19 • #10 
Piscator
Joined: 08/10/05
Posts: 16311
Location: downtown Bulverde, Texas
I'd guess in PA, he's looking for small streams.


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Post 02 Jul 2020, 13:52 • #11 
Guide
Joined: 06/25/20
Posts: 115
Location: Easton, PA
bulldog1935 wrote:
I'd guess in PA, he's looking for small streams.


I'm in the process of getting my feet under me as a fisherman. I have been through allot of health issues in the past year and one year ago I put down the spinning reel and with My right hand in a cast learned to fly fish using the left hand. and I retrieve with the left as well but strip with the right hand.

More and more I am warm water fishing in shallow lakes. But there are allot of freestone creek around teaming with fiesty panfish of every stripe.

I had some bad experiences with medium fast graphite rods and have settled on old style fiberglass. I don't really know all the descriptive terms and so I'm just bumbling through here. I like a rod that bends freely. I don't mind if the tip is a little faster but even that isn't too important.
I feel like I need two primary rigs:
-One would be for crashing and smashing bigger bugs and streamers through pads and weedbeds. I have that now. 7/8 glass
-The second would be for cleaner water such as colder lakes and open small to medium freestone streams. This should be a little lighter, maybe 5-6. I want it to feature a Battenkill III or so. This will be the next rod purchase I make.
-Lastly a small finesse rod for wet and dry flies in tiny trout streams and clear winter ponds would be nice. maybe 4-5wt. On this I will use an old Wye reel that I have.


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Post 02 Jul 2020, 15:13 • #12 
Guide
Joined: 06/25/20
Posts: 115
Location: Easton, PA
Upstreeam wrote:
I wouldn’t get a rod marketed as parabolic until you know that’s what you want. I have rods that are definitely parabolic, some sternly progressive, some marked semi-parabolic, and most undesignated. Basically, I could describe almost all of them as some version of fast to slow progressive until you get to the parabolics; although I can see what the designers meant when saying semi-parabolic, it pretty much goes out of mine when fishing. The real parabolics are a different kettle of fish, and often require remembering that on the stream. Be aware that some of the uncertainty of what constitutes parabolic means that many will apply the term to any deep flexing rod, and you might like that action, so I wouldn’t steer away from “deep” of “slow” rods because of the above recommendation; I just wouldn’t suggest a rod designed as parabolic to a beginning fly fisherman.

What kind of fishing do you do? In vintage, 8 ft 6 wt is good general spot, with a lot of options. Shorter and maybe lighter are often used by trout fishermen here, and at the moment there seem to be a number of good deals on such
rods on our for sale board.



While I have already done that and will do it again.......sort through the stuff members are offering, or now I'm not especially sure what I'd be looking at. I usually fish from a drift boat on the river or more frequently in a lake. My target is usually panfish, pickerel, and if I have to, bass. I'm just thinking vintage because there is so much to choose from in fiberglass. And I can often get them 3 or 4 to one over new. Plus I tend to revere Vintage more than new.


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Post 02 Jul 2020, 19:08 • #13 
Master Guide
Joined: 06/11/05
Posts: 817
Location: US-NY
Baron wrote:
..,
5) not that I particularly care but will your laugh If I show up at your fishing hole with my beloved snake guides? :) ;)


I would laugh if you did not have snake guides.


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Post 02 Jul 2020, 19:14 • #14 
New Member
Joined: 06/23/20
Posts: 23
Baron, I still have not gone out with my new-to-me rods. I have an FF79, another 7 foot built blank, and two heavier rods for striper / salmon. An FF909 and a graphite GFF910.

I am 66 yrs. old and am going to blissfully cast my ignorant rear to happy times in retirement. I have a few different reels and again, I'm going to swing 'em! I Watched the Jim Green casting video in one of the threads here, (search), so I am ready to give it a good effort. You really need to watch it is my only advice.

I had the opinion fly casting was 'too much work' for years. Watching Jim Green's effortless casting gives me new hope of a fun future.

And the member knowledge here is boundless. Good luck from a fellow rookie.


Last edited by Guitarfish on 04 Jul 2020, 13:46, edited 1 time in total.

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Post 02 Jul 2020, 20:01 • #15 
Guide
Joined: 06/25/20
Posts: 115
Location: Easton, PA
Guitarfish wrote:
Baron, I still have not gone out with my new-to-me rods. I have an FF79, another 7 foot built blank, and two heavier rods for striper / salmon. An FF910 and a graphite GFF910.

I am 66 yrs. old and am going to blissfully cast my ignorant rear to happy times in retirement. I have a few different reels and again, I'm going to swing 'em! I Watched the Jim Green casting video in one of the threads here, (search), so I am ready to give it a good effort. You really need to watch it is my only advice.

I had the opinion fly casting was 'too much work' for years. Watching Jim Green's effortless casting gives me new hope of a fun future.

And the member knowledge here is boundless. Good luck from a fellow rookie.


This site is amazing for members willingness to share. I'v only fly-fishing for a year and am just getting to where my casting is reliable but there is a plethora of nuances to learn yet. I've stayed with some pretty basic stuff so that I can get my feet wet without going broke. I'll look up Greens vid's and glean them for snacks.
Thanks Guitarfish


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Post 06 Jul 2020, 06:16 • #16 
Master Guide
Joined: 06/24/11
Posts: 919
Location: Belgium
If your budget is tight old Fenwick rods are a good place look at. I can think of the FF79 or FF805 for your medium rod. For really light line rods there is plenty of choice among recent production - plenty of good rods covered in the forum.


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Post 06 Jul 2020, 06:58 • #17 
Piscator
Joined: 08/10/05
Posts: 16311
Location: downtown Bulverde, Texas
people are practically giving away Phillipson Scotchply rods on the classifieds, e.g., Royal Wand current listing.
For any kind of power fishing (casting), warmwater, big flies, roll-casting, they're way ahead of Fenwick.
Intuitive progressive tapers with quick power. .


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Post 06 Jul 2020, 12:08 • #18 
Guide
Joined: 11/18/18
Posts: 298
Location: US-TX
Just have fun don't think about it


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Post 06 Jul 2020, 16:17 • #19 
Glass Fanatic
Joined: 10/20/11
Posts: 1677
Location: US-MD
In casting less is more... and watch your backcast as it’ll tell you when to move forward


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Post 06 Jul 2020, 19:08 • #20 
Guide
Joined: 02/05/15
Posts: 196
Location: Hawkes Bay, New Zealand
Still consider the Bushkill as my home waters as I am originally from Tatamy, PA just up the road from Easton. Grew up along the banks of the Bushkill. You would be remiss if you do not avail yourself of the wild browns and stockies found there. Since you are interested in vintage rods, a Fenwick FF75 would do well there. For years my only rod was a Heddon Pro Weight #8381 which I used there. Welcome to the forum and good luck!


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Post 06 Jul 2020, 20:02 • #21 
Glass Fanatic
Joined: 12/05/06
Posts: 1339
Location: US-PA
BlackHackle wrote:
Still consider the Bushkill as my home waters as I am originally from Tatamy, PA just up the road from Easton. Grew up along the banks of the Bushkill. You would be remiss if you do not avail yourself of the wild browns and stockies found there.

There was ANOTHER massive fish kill on the Bushkill a few weeks back when the quarry pumps failed during a thunderstorm.

Pretty much a wipe-out so the fishing there won't be worthwhile for some time.


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Post 07 Jul 2020, 21:28 • #22 
Guide
Joined: 02/05/15
Posts: 196
Location: Hawkes Bay, New Zealand
From past experience, the Bushkill was probably dry from Stockertown to Tatamy and that would have eliminated the fishery to that point. Just below Tatamy there are a series of springs that probably allowed enough water to remain in the stream for the fish to survive. There are additional springs and Schoeneck Creek entering the stream as you head downstream toward Easton. Have not heard any news of the aftermath of the stream drying up but would think the stretch from Tatamy to Easton is probably okay. Still you would think the cement company would install an emergency generator to run their quarry pumps in the event of a power failure. This is not the first time this has happened.


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Post 15 Jul 2020, 11:43 • #23 
Guide
Joined: 06/25/20
Posts: 115
Location: Easton, PA
Bushkill, I love it but I fish Martins Creek generally.
Sorry, I was away for a week and didn't realize how many responses were added. I will be looking at Fenwick and have already been charmed by Phillipson and immediately recognized their affordable prices. Last week I bought one of the new Eagle Claw Crafted Glass $35 rods to hold me over. It worked well on The Green River last week but it is heavy.
20 yrs ago I was the assistant supervisor of grounds at Lafayette College. one of the geologist there did allot of research on the sinkholes and under-lying anomalies of the area around Tatamy. Its interesting. It is not only the pumps that are the problem but also the water table. It seems that every so many years it gets so dry that the actual water table drops below a certain level and the creek actually runs under the ground. This area is the same area that the pumps failed (btwn Stockertown and Tatamy).
Rumor has it that at one time the Bushkill had the most dams per mile than any other stream for quite a ways. Many of these dams are gone now. The underground races and tunnels still run all over under the city of Easton. I know this because a colleague at Laffayette witnessed many of them being blocked off as the city developed its infrastructure. There is allot of folks that think the rest of the dams should also come down. I'm sort of on the fence with this idea though I'd love to see the Lehigh run free once more.


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Post 16 Jul 2020, 14:23 • #24 
Guide
Joined: 06/25/20
Posts: 115
Location: Easton, PA
Those Springs that you mention must be below the Ball Field. Years ago when I lived on the old Klock Farm at the south end of the runway we tried to cool down one day by wading just below the mill and Tatamy Farm Bureau. It was probably 100 degrees that day but the water was to cold and we had to leave it.
Tatamy Farm Bureau closed two years ago.


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Post 17 Jul 2020, 00:16 • #25 
Guide
Joined: 02/05/15
Posts: 196
Location: Hawkes Bay, New Zealand
Boy, you are bringing back memories for me. The first spring is where the old dam was located in Tatamy. There are several going downstream but a couple of larger ones are just below the Farm Bureau bridge. There were apartments just below the bridge and an old spring house where a sizeable spring entered the stream. The apartments are gone now but don't know if the spring house is still there. When I was a kid before they relocated Bushkill Drive we used to hunt pheasants and rabbits across the street from our house on Bushkill Drive along the Bushkill. In summer used to fish different stretches of the Bushkill every day it was clear from Tatamy down to Bushkill Park. We also stole pumpkins from Klockie's fields at Halloween. This was in the 1960s, geesh, makes me sound old!


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