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Fishing Boots
Post 05 Feb 2008, 18:05 • #1 
Glass Fanatic
Joined: 12/03/07
Posts: 1143
Location: Shenandoah Valley of Virginia
I think we need a new section to post stuff on non-rod gear. Anyway, I wore my first non-felt boots for the first time today. I got a pair of Bean rubber bottom wading boots and boy are they great. Much easier to climb around the rocks with these than the felt bottom boots. If you like to hike and fish mountain trout streams and have to climb around rocks, walk up and down steep banks, these are way better than the felt boots. I think they were about 70 bucks.


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Fishing Boots
Post 05 Feb 2008, 18:11 • #2 
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Joined: 07/17/06
Posts: 5576
Location: South Carolina
gearboy ... I've been using Aquastealth soled wading boots now for about eight years and they are a great long lasting material. You're going to be happy with those boots without a doubt.


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Fishing Boots
Post 06 Feb 2008, 07:09 • #3 
Master Guide
Joined: 06/28/06
Posts: 744
Location: Eastern Massachustts
How do they perform on freestone rivers with basketball size slippery rocks? I currently use felt soles with studs ... and a wading staff. :\
Lou


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Post 06 Feb 2008, 07:44 • #4 
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Joined: 03/14/06
Posts: 404
Location: US-TX
Pretty good. I've never slipped in my Aquastealths where I wouldn't have slipped with felt. You can get studds put in aquastealths.


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Post 06 Feb 2008, 10:42 • #5 
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Joined: 12/06/05
Posts: 394
Location: US-TN
The felt vs. Aquastealth debate is kind of like the old short rod vs. long rod debate: the only honest answer, I think, is "it depends.":lol For my fishing in the Southern Appalachia's, my pair of Simms Guides with studded Aquastealth were ideal: I spent most of my time scrambling on the bank and made a concerted effort to stay out of the water. Any problems I had were caused more by the studs than the rubber soles: flat, dry rocks are not your friends.

That said, I think if you're wading across the proverbial "snot-covered bowling balls" a pair of high-quality felts would be safer if your feet are always "pitched" at an angle. In fact, the Jewish mom in me would say the best solution for that substrate would be to buy one of the nifty new switch rods and to learn how to spey cast.:D Then again, I'm middle-aged, and I've noticed that the ground is remarkably harder than it was a few decades ago ...


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Fishing Boots
Post 07 Feb 2008, 06:18 • #6 
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Joined: 05/20/07
Posts: 414
Location: US-CT
Wonderful thread. I second the need for more anecdotal opines on gear besides rods. I have been stewing on getting a pair of waders and boots. I finally decided on the Hodgman wadelite breathable stocking foot, fits the best, and from Sierra Trading Post, last years Korkers Wading Boots. They come with two interchangeable soles, felt and lugged rubber. Leather, top of the line boots that are half price due to clearance. My wading staff is a good solid carbide tipped aluminum ski pole in a very bright color so that I can find it when I lay it down. And, it I lose it it, it is $1.99 for another at Goodwill. I am looking at it now and thinking that if I had bought the pair instead of just one, I could perhaps put a ferrule in the thing ALA Fenwick FF. Glenn


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Fishing Boots
Post 07 Feb 2008, 16:19 • #7 
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Joined: 01/26/07
Posts: 1173
Location: Ada, Oklahoma
I'm with CreationBear on this subject. On really slick snot rocks, I have found studded felt to be my best choice. In areas where I have to scramble up and down steep rocky banks, the unstudded AquaStealth is my hands down favorite. In other areas, I will choose either plain felt or studded AquaStealth. I bought a pair of Korkers about four years ago, and have found them to be the best boots I have ever used. For hiking in to a fishing hole, the plain ribbed rubber soles are fine, and it only takes about a minute to swap to whatever other sole I might need once I have arrived. I have regular felt, studded felt, ribbed hiking soles, plain AquaStealth, and studded AquaStealth. The boots are very comfortable to walk in and afford good ankle support. The only disadvantage I have found is the leather in the uppers which requires wetting the boots first before I put them on, which means if I have to hike in before fishing, I may have to wet down the boots before I leave home, otherwise they are difficult to pull on over my sockfoot waders.

Larry


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Fishing Boots
Post 07 Feb 2008, 17:05 • #8 
Master Guide
Joined: 05/20/07
Posts: 414
Location: US-CT
OK, how about spraying the leather with either silicone spray before they dry out or maybe better yet, WD40? One story is that what makes WD40 work is fish oil. Some even use it to spray their flies with as they think it works as an attractant. WD40 denies that it has silicone in it so there may be something to it. (The company does not substantiate this) The trick to making any leather soft, and last, is to keep it from drying out. Then the fibers break. I once had a leather girth that was over 50 years old and was in excellent condition.


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Fishing Boots
Post 09 Feb 2008, 00:24 • #9 
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Joined: 12/03/07
Posts: 1143
Location: Shenandoah Valley of Virginia
WD 40 contains kerosene. I wouldn't be spraying it on anything and then putting it into a stream! The best use for WD 40 is to use it to take off old stickers, the kero in it helps to remove the old glue.


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Fishing Boots
Post 09 Feb 2008, 17:12 • #10 
New Member
Joined: 01/26/08
Posts: 10
I'm about to invest in a pair of the Bean Aquastealth soled boots - I figure even if I loose a little bit of stability in slick conditions, maybe I'll make up for it in my ability to keep them clean between streams and not carry didymo or other contaminants between watersheds.


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Fishing Boots
Post 10 Feb 2008, 16:43 • #11 
Master Guide
Joined: 05/20/07
Posts: 414
Location: US-CT
OK, nix on the Wd40. Today I happened (while I am waiting for delivery of my Korker boots) on a good used pair of Orvis wading boots. They are not a current model, and are just right barefoot with a pair of heavy socks, not roomy enough for the foam stockingfoot waders. I figure they will be good for warm water, surf applications. What do you guys use in the warm water to keep the sand and stuff out of the boots when you are bare legged? Same would apply for those wearing tennis shoes.


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Post 10 Feb 2008, 17:58 • #12 
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Joined: 07/17/06
Posts: 5576
Location: South Carolina
flyboy912 ... which Korker's did you order? I am thinking about getting the Streamborn's ... and upgrading to the Aquastealth soles. I'd appreciate a review once you have them in hand.


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Fishing Boots
Post 11 Feb 2008, 04:56 • #13 
Sport
Joined: 02/04/07
Posts: 77
Location: US-CT
WD-40

* 50%: Stoddard solvent (mineral spirits, somewhat similar to, but not the same as, kerosene)
* 25%: Liquefied petroleum gas (presumably as a propellant, carbon dioxide is used now to reduce considerable flammability)
* 15+%: Mineral oil (light lubricating oil)
* 10-%: Inert ingredients


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Post 11 Feb 2008, 15:31 • #14 
Glass Fanatic
Joined: 01/26/07
Posts: 1173
Location: Ada, Oklahoma
Flyboy:

When wet wading, I always (or nearly always) wear a pair of slip on gaiters that fit snugly over the top of the boots with a hook at the bottom that hooks onto the laces to keep them from sliding up. While not 100% effective, it does keep out most of the sand and gravel.

Larry


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Post 11 Feb 2008, 19:53 • #15 
Master Guide
Joined: 05/20/07
Posts: 414
Location: US-CT
I have had nothing to do lately but ponder this weighty imponderable. How to keep the sand and silt out of my boots if not wearing the waders with the built-in gravel guard. The slip on neoprene sleeve things look like too much to wrestle with after a tiring day. Sportsman's Warehouse has some nifty socklike things that cost $28 and are waterproof. They have some fleece lined that are $40something. Fat Chance. Cameron, they are the Korker Wading Boots. That is the name, $124 marked down to $64 because they were last years.comes with felt and rubber bottoms, interchangable. The Streamside is the same thing, just newer model. Both are leather. Both comes with the two soles, but six are available, including Aquastealth. that is likely just a tricky grippy soft rubber sole. And, the extra soles are expensive. Xtra Tuff are the popular boots on Alaska workboats because they are good on icy steel decks. Likely similar material.


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Fishing Boots
Post 12 Feb 2008, 09:46 • #16 
Master Guide
Joined: 05/20/07
Posts: 414
Location: US-CT
The Korkers came in today. A disappointment in the way they fit. Seemed to bite into my leg at the top of the boot. Also, they were suppose to be leather and they were not. So, back they go. My Orvis fit much better as they are taller and support the front of the foot. Lesson learned, try on somehow or take a chance.:(


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