It is currently 11 Dec 2017, 02:41

All times are UTC - 5 hours




Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next   Page 1 of 6   [ 126 posts ] New Topic Add Reply
Author Message
 Post subject: Cleaning Reels
PostPosted: 25 Apr 2007, 08:37 • # 1 
Piscator
Joined: 08/10/05
Posts: 11999
Location: downtown Bulverde, Texas
the question has been raised.
Reels are loaded with gunk and corrosion - usually 70 to 80 years' worth by the time I get them. They're made out of aluminum, brass and steel, painted, anodized, or bare. Lubricants oxidize, releasing acids (or caustic in the case of lithium) form tars and waxes and eventually turn into polymers. Limestone residues from chalk streams are corrosive to aluminum.

Reels have it tough. I've never taken before photos, and I've had some nasty ones, but most of you have seen some of my after photos. Here's what I do. (credit to Richard Thomann who gave me this procedure 10 year ago, though, I've added my caveats, touches and insight from my experience working with it)

1) Take the reel down as far as you feel comfortable.
2) Wipe everything down with paper towels or q-tips and whatever you can to remove the loose debris and old lubricant.

3) Vinegar-water bath. This is generally four parts warm water to one part vinegar. Temperature, time and vinegar content can all go up (up to 3 hours) if you reel is all brass. (NOT painted brass - use only soapy water rinses and brushes on painted brass, because the hydrogen generated in any immersion solution will blow the paint right off.)

some basic guidelines - 30 to 45 minutes for painted reels, or rubber side plates and handles (bakelite is impervious)
wouldn't go past 1 hour for lead finished alloy fly reels
2 hours for plated brass
3 hours for bare brass or German silver

Generally, we're looking at finger-warm solution for about an hour or less. On a painted aluminum reel or lead finished reel, you might want to keep it down to a half-hour. Although, lead finish is usually more tolerant than paint, so you can push to the full hour if it needs it. And take it out when its visibly clean. Take a soft tooth brush to the debris every 10-15 minutes. This solution should do the bulk of your cleaning. If you have tenacious crud, rusted steel, dealloyed brass (looks pink) you may want to push it a little longer, but balance it against the visible effects on your finish. Rub out the insides of bushings with q-tips or twisted up paper towel.
Rinse well in lukewarm water.

4) dilute soap bath - very dilute. Alkalis cause corrosion of aluminum. Ammonia causes cracking of brass. Not to alarm you, but you're simply using this bath to wet and remove the tar remnants that were broken up by the vinegar, and to neutralize residual vinegar. Again use the soft toothbrush to break up any residues.

5) Final rinse - very thorough cold-water rinse here. Be careful of the sink rinsing off your tiny parts.
6) Air dry - overnight is good.

7) Rub with a wax or silicone guncloth. This is also a good time to put on a coating of Butcher's Bowling Alley Wax if you want to do that kind of thing.

8 ) Lube and reassemble - use Zebco Quantum Hot Sauce - the good stuff.
Hot Sauce Grease on drag gears, and on worn and wobbly spindles. Hot Sauce Lube (light oil) on spindles/bushings, handle spindles, pawl stanchions, bearings, drag blocks and threads.

___________________

special topics.

Magnesium reels - Marryat, Battenkill MkIII - exposed magnesium appears to react vigorously with vinegar, so it's probably wisest to bypass soaking in solutions and use Boeshield for cleaning.

Solvents - acetone is for removing paint and plastic handles - be very careful. Yes, it removes tars also. Be very careful.

One application for denatured alcohol is removing old line varnish from inside a spool. It will usually come out with a good swipe, but try to avoid drips, keep it away from handles, follow quickly with a dry swab and even limit exposure to the paint.

oxidizers/colorants/patinating agents with their steps and rinses would fit between steps 6 and 7 above, but this is real art that I'm going to dodge here.

Abrasives/polishes.
I'm going to mostly stay away from this, because I usually quit at wax.
But OK, I keep Pol metal polish around, and always have "Miracle" lemon-oil polishing cloths.
I lightly and quickly rub down my rods with Miracle polishing cloths to keep the calcium buildup down, and chase that with a chamois.
They are also very useful for rubbing out rust on steel - there you go Cameron.

more discussion can be found on this ORCA page
orca-online.org/reel-talk/viewforum.php?f=6

Hope this helps,
Ron Mc

p.s. here's the goal
Image


Last edited by bulldog1935 on 19 Jan 2011, 04:35, edited 1 time in total.

Top
  
Quote
 Post subject: Cleaning Reels
PostPosted: 25 Apr 2007, 10:46 • # 2 
Administrator
Joined: 07/17/06
Posts: 5548
Location: South Carolina
Question asked ... and very completely answered.

Thank you.


Top
  
Quote
 Post subject: Cleaning Reels
PostPosted: 20 May 2007, 05:48 • # 3 
Sport
Joined: 10/17/05
Posts: 91
Wow! I feel like sending all my old Pfluegars to you. I think the whole board will appreciate this post.

Randy


Top
  
Quote
 Post subject: Cleaning Reels
PostPosted: 29 Jun 2007, 19:00 • # 4 
New Member
Joined: 06/13/07
Posts: 24
Just wondered what you think about using white lithium grease on the inside of the reels? Thanks, Rob


Top
  
Quote
 Post subject: Cleaning Reels
PostPosted: 02 Jul 2007, 09:16 • # 5 
Administrator
Joined: 01/10/06
Posts: 6270
Location: Holly Springs, NC
Lithium grease? EVIL! Really, avoid it at all costs.

Reread bulldog's post and follow every word. The recommended Quantum Hot Sauce lubricants are available at the big outdoor stores (Cabela's, BassPro, etc.). A tube of grease and a bottle of oil will last a LONG time. Considering what we pay for reels, the money spent on good lubricants is well worth it.

Tom


Top
  
Quote
 Post subject: Cleaning Reels
PostPosted: 02 Jul 2007, 10:12 • # 6 
Piscator
Joined: 08/10/05
Posts: 11999
Location: downtown Bulverde, Texas
thanks, Tom

the concensus over at ORCA is that lithium absorbs water and salt, and can break down to release lithium, which is corrosive to aluminum
probably less of a concern on modern anodized reels (unless they have scratches), but a serious concern on vintage and venerable alloy reels


Top
  
Quote
 Post subject: Cleaning Reels
PostPosted: 08 Jul 2007, 11:39 • # 7 
Glass Fanatic
Joined: 03/20/07
Posts: 2551
Location: Wofford Heights, Calif. Kern River
Hi Ron,

Picked up a number of Young reels this last couple of weeks, all have exactly the same problem area in cleaning. What to take the Waxed residue from inside the spool left by wet waxed silk and early braided nylon flylines. I can and have cleaned the rest of the reels spotless down to this trouble point. Not wanting to damage the painted finish from inside the spool area how about some hints for really stubbern almost baked in residue.

Richard


Top
  
Quote
 Post subject: Cleaning Reels
PostPosted: 24 Sep 2007, 18:54 • # 8 
New Member
Joined: 09/23/07
Posts: 19
For drying I would recommend using an air compressor with filters in the air line. Blowing off the parts will get the water. Also rubbing alcohol on an old T-shirt makes a great cleaner for metal products and dries very fast. When your done you just throw the old rag away and be done with it.


Top
  
Quote
 Post subject: Cleaning Reels
PostPosted: 30 Nov 2007, 00:36 • # 9 
Guide
Joined: 12/20/06
Posts: 190
Location: US-MD
Ron,
Just picked up a Hardy Zenith that's in great shape with the exception of glue residue on both sides from old masking tape amd reel dots. I guess the previous owner liked to use those to indicate the type of line. What's the best approach for removing the old glue from the aluminum and painted aluminum surfaces? Thanks for the wisdom in advance ...


Top
  
Quote
 Post subject: Cleaning Reels
PostPosted: 30 Nov 2007, 08:17 • # 10 
Piscator
Joined: 08/10/05
Posts: 11999
Location: downtown Bulverde, Texas
denatured alcohol would be my choice.
don't pour it onto the reel - even though it should be safe you want to minimize contact with the paint.
The good news is, it will flash dry quickly.
So use cotton balls or just paper towels.
Dip the swab in the alcohol. Rub it across the glue film, then quickly rub it with a dry swab. You should be able to go through several cycles of this without hurting the paint.


Top
  
Quote
 Post subject: Cleaning Reels
PostPosted: 03 Dec 2007, 04:08 • # 11 
Piscator
Joined: 08/10/05
Posts: 11999
Location: downtown Bulverde, Texas
like a dummy, I never take before photos.
This reel was green and red with corrosion.
I only used vinegar on the nickel silver parts - I cleaned the hard rubber side plates with denatured alcohol

Image

Image

Image


Top
  
Quote
 Post subject: Cleaning Reels
PostPosted: 28 Dec 2007, 01:39 • # 12 
Glass Fanatic
Joined: 12/03/07
Posts: 1127
Location: Shenandoah Valley of Virginia
WD40 works great for cleaning old stickers. The kerosene in it safely removes old glue and the paper.


Top
  
Quote
 Post subject: Cleaning Reels
PostPosted: 08 Jan 2008, 16:55 • # 13 
Master Guide
Joined: 01/08/08
Posts: 626
Location: US-MA
Will the water and vinegar solution help with mildew? I received a couple of reels that had either been put away damp or stored in a basement (inside their cases) for a prolonged period of time. I've only aired them out and exposed them to sunlight so far. I'm sure you all have had similiar experiences. What's the best way to proceed? Much Thanks.

Steve


Top
  
Quote
 Post subject: Cleaning Reels
PostPosted: 21 Jan 2008, 06:52 • # 14 
Guide
Joined: 09/30/07
Posts: 320
Ron, where in a 3 1/2" Condex would you use oil, and where would you use grease?


Top
  
Quote
 Post subject: Cleaning Reels
PostPosted: 01 Feb 2008, 10:54 • # 15 
New Member
Joined: 01/31/08
Posts: 2
Does anyone use vinegar and heated ultrasonic cleaner?. I have been told it works well.


Top
  
Quote
 Post subject: Cleaning Reels
PostPosted: 11 Feb 2008, 15:06 • # 16 
Master Guide
Joined: 06/27/06
Posts: 698
Location: SW Missouri Ozark Plateau
I've never used Hot Sauce before, but I think I will order some, based on the good things you guys have had to say about it. It sounds like it must be a superb lube.


Top
  
Quote
 Post subject: Cleaning Reels
PostPosted: 24 Mar 2008, 18:30 • # 17 
Glass Fanatic
Joined: 02/19/08
Posts: 2355
Location: Seattle, WA
Steps 1-6 were awesome for cleaning up my H-I Sportcraft 60 and Edwards Mfg #30 reels. They look almost new now. But for the final step, what's the preferred method (and appicator) for applying the Hot Sauce Grease and Oil? Thanks! Dave


Top
  
Quote
 Post subject: Cleaning Reels
PostPosted: 27 Mar 2008, 06:51 • # 18 
Piscator
Joined: 08/10/05
Posts: 11999
Location: downtown Bulverde, Texas
well, they both have reasonable applicators - the Grease, especially works very well from its tube.

I drop out a little "ball" of grease, then use the tip to spread it over the gear teeth, do the next one, etc, until I have an even coating around the gear teeth.
After I assemble the reel, I will operate the reel in both directions a few times (OK, ALOT - I LIKE PLAYING WITH REELS OK?), and then take the spool off, and remove the excess from the bottom of the drag gear and from the inside of the reel backplate.
The other place to use grease is of course the latch bar groove and, other than keeping the excess off the spindle, there is no need to police it here.

I don't like the Hot Sauce oil applicator, because it leaks oil everywhere after you open it. I got myself a vintage oiler than has a twist-close nozzle at the end, so I decant my Lube into that.
A little bit goes a long way, but I oil the pawl stanchion, spindle, and handle, threads on tensioners, spring tips on tensioners, even a touch on the spring/pawl contact patch..

Hope this helps.

and since this page needs a photo, anyway:

Image


Last edited by bulldog1935 on 27 Mar 2008, 06:54, edited 1 time in total.

Top
  
Quote
 Post subject: Cleaning Reels
PostPosted: 27 Mar 2008, 16:25 • # 19 
Glass Fanatic
Joined: 02/19/08
Posts: 2355
Location: Seattle, WA
Thanks Bulldog ... You da man!


Top
  
Quote
 Post subject: Cleaning Reels
PostPosted: 02 Jun 2008, 17:24 • # 20 
Master Guide
Joined: 11/23/11
Posts: 576
Question, the oil from the handle spindle, keeps seeping out onto my hand. Anything I can do, other than reclean the spool and not oil it this time? I hope there is a way to clean it up without removing the line from the spool as I have it lined already. If not, I will remove the line from it, and see what I can do. Here is a picture of what I am talking about.

Image

Thanks Ron!


Last edited by Anonymous on 02 Jun 2008, 17:33, edited 1 time in total.

Top
  
Quote
 Post subject: Cleaning Reels
PostPosted: 02 Jun 2008, 18:35 • # 21 
Administrator
Joined: 01/10/06
Posts: 6270
Location: Holly Springs, NC
Just wipe it down periodically for a couple of days and eventually it will stop seeping. Or you can try wicking out the excess with a Qtip.

I use a needle to pick up Quantum Hot Sauce from the bottle (I pitched that nasty applicator top). One or two small drops are sufficient to oil a handle once they have worked in. If necessary you can always add more the next day.

Tom


Top
  
Quote
 Post subject: Cleaning Reels
PostPosted: 02 Jun 2008, 18:48 • # 22 
Glass Fanatic
Joined: 03/20/07
Posts: 2551
Location: Wofford Heights, Calif. Kern River
yea a little goes a long way I use alot of those old fashioned wood round toothpicks to put just a drop where I want it.


Top
  
Quote
 Post subject: Cleaning Reels
PostPosted: 03 Jun 2008, 04:30 • # 23 
Master Guide
Joined: 11/23/11
Posts: 576
Yeah, I cleaned the spool again last night to get rid of it all, and it held just enough to stay lubed, without seeping onto me. Thanks guys! I guess a trip to the grocery store, as well as the hardware store is in order today ... Thanks again!


Top
  
Quote
 Post subject: Cleaning Reels
PostPosted: 18 Aug 2008, 05:31 • # 24 
Piscator
Joined: 08/10/05
Posts: 11999
Location: downtown Bulverde, Texas
dennis wrote:
The thread on cleaning reels is great -- and I have completed one older reel -- Is the same process good for newer reels? Or some older reels which have been stored away for a while?
I would like to clean out the old lube and redress with Hot Sauce.
Regards,
Dennis
I would say wipe them down, wipe out the old lube, and take denatured alcohol to any tenacious lube and dirt.

I like to use Butcher's wax when done.

something I find myself using more and more lately for cleaning (esp. inside) reels is Boeshield.


Top
  
Quote
 Post subject: Cleaning Reels
PostPosted: 04 Sep 2008, 04:24 • # 25 
Piscator
Joined: 08/10/05
Posts: 11999
Location: downtown Bulverde, Texas
Back to Boeshield.
I first bought it to protect my salt reels.
This stuff is amazing.
I sprayed it on a near-frozen Golden West as penetrating oil, hoping to free up the screws - the next day, the reel was working like a new reel. Boeshield displaces water from hydrated salts and reduces corrosion products, plus it cleans and provides a corrosion barrier - good stuff.
It has become the product I use for cleaning on reels which are already free from tars and waxes from age-old lubricants (i.e. the stuff that makes them need a vinegar bath).
I use it for light cleaning to remove and replace recent lubes.
I use it for light cleaning when I'm working on other folks' reels (to keep my hands clean while I'm in there working).
Don't rush out and spend $12 for the stuff, but if I was going to recommend one product for being nice to fly reels, this would be it.
Image


Last edited by bulldog1935 on 04 Sep 2008, 04:28, edited 1 time in total.

Top
  
Quote
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  

Go to page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next   Page 1 of 6   [ 126 posts ] New Topic Add Reply

All times are UTC - 5 hours



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Jump to:  
Google
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group