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 Post subject: Centre pin?
PostPosted: 15 Sep 2008, 09:51 • # 1 
Master Guide
Joined: 03/20/07
Posts: 479
Location: US-TX
What exactly is a "centre pin" anyway?
How is that different from a spindle?
Thanks!


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 Post subject: Centre pin?
PostPosted: 15 Sep 2008, 10:01 • # 2 
Master Guide
Joined: 01/12/08
Posts: 353
Location: US-TX
If your talking about the Ross reel then I'm curious as well. I saw the promotional video but still don't understand what kind of fishing it is for? The way it spined forever looked cool but I have no clue as to what the reel is for? Hope someone chimes in to give us the lowdown. If thats not the reel your talking about then I'll sit back and listen and learn something about another reel.

Ray ...


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 Post subject: Centre pin?
PostPosted: 15 Sep 2008, 11:25 • # 3 
Piscator
Joined: 08/10/05
Posts: 13144
Location: downtown Bulverde, Texas
there are two different ways to describe a centrepin.

By function - a trotting reel or UK spinning reel - the Aerial or the type reel, the Simplex:
http://www.antiquetackleobserver.com/?cat=9

By architecture - a modern fly reel counts, with a center pin spindle fixed to the backplate, the bushing is contained in the spool and is the full width of the spool.
Image

although the design goes back to the wooden Scarborough and Nottingham reels
Image

Versus a conventional reel architecture, where the spindle is part of the spool, and it rides on small fixed bushings in end plates; the end plates are caged by pillars.
Image Image


Last edited by bulldog1935 on 01 Oct 2008, 04:41, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Centre pin?
PostPosted: 15 Sep 2008, 11:35 • # 4 
Piscator
Joined: 08/10/05
Posts: 13144
Location: downtown Bulverde, Texas
But most of the time you see it used, they will be talking about a reel for trotting, swimming or steelheading, where you let the current pay the line for long, long dead drift.
Image


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 Post subject: Centre pin?
PostPosted: 15 Sep 2008, 15:47 • # 5 
Glass Fanatic
Joined: 08/25/08
Posts: 1272
Location: Delton, MI
Here's one. It's not a particularly fancy one, but it sure is pretty.
ImageImage


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 Post subject: Centre pin?
PostPosted: 16 Sep 2008, 08:57 • # 6 
Master Guide
Joined: 03/20/07
Posts: 479
Location: US-TX
Very cool. Thanks.


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 Post subject: Centre pin?
PostPosted: 16 Sep 2008, 11:19 • # 7 
Master Guide
Joined: 01/12/08
Posts: 353
Location: US-TX
Wow, a wood reel. I guess years ago they probably advertised "aproved for saltwater "Image Bull, are you saying that a reel spool that is supported on one side of the frame is a 'center pin'? I'm showing my ignorance but I am curious and curious minds want to learn. From the way you explained what the reel is for I don't think that would be my kind of fishing as sometimes its heck to get in fifty feet of line between casts and especially when a fish is caught ... Ray ...


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 Post subject: Centre pin?
PostPosted: 16 Sep 2008, 11:40 • # 8 
Glass Fanatic
Joined: 09/29/06
Posts: 4426
Location: Willamette Valley, Oregon
some of those centerpin reels will take in line quickly. Check out the reels from Young online. Gorgeous things.


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 Post subject: Centre pin?
PostPosted: 16 Sep 2008, 14:31 • # 9 
Piscator
Joined: 08/10/05
Posts: 13144
Location: downtown Bulverde, Texas
no 4" to 4-1/2" centrepins are the choice of serious steelheaders. They really have no drag to speak of, so they are palmed for brakes. They take in line quickly.
here is that Young link
http://www.jwyoungs.co.uk/reels.htm

here is the original Aerial - you see they are described as all-round reels.
Image Image

here's another Young-made Allcock variant, the Swift
Image Image Image
even on my modern JAF Aerial, the check disengages (the button on the back) to free-spool the reel
Image Image


Last edited by bulldog1935 on 16 Sep 2008, 14:37, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Centre pin?
PostPosted: 30 Sep 2008, 05:40 • # 10 
Guide
Joined: 08/28/07
Posts: 101
Up my way there is are some guys who centre pin fish for steelhead. They take some abuse from the other fisherman. Why? It's a very effective way to fish and the better ones put a hurtin' on the trout. Like Bulldog said, the dragless free spinning reel alows for LONG drag free drifts, like over 100 feet. On big water like the Lower Niagara River this allows you to cover alot more water with each cast. Some use traditional trout flies, others use egg sack/spawn, micro jigs or live minnows. These are fished under a slip bobber using a long limber rod and light test mono. For that type of steelhead fishing, I'll stick to fly fishing and occasionally spin fishing with my noodle rod. Not that I'm against using a centre pin, I just don't need to be buying any new kind of fishing gear.
Tom


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 Post subject: Centre pin?
PostPosted: 30 Sep 2008, 05:51 • # 11 
Master Guide
Joined: 09/29/08
Posts: 432
Location: US-NJ
Center pinning is a first cousin to cane pole fishing with a bobber carefully weighted to present a bait/fly/jig precisely and with no drag. The center pin reel turns with practically no friction so that the bobber you are fishing with can dead drift the whole length of a pool or run off a centre pin reel. A long rod (commonly 13' or so) is used to pick all that line off the water. There is some art involved since it takes an "educated thumb" to keep the reel from over-running and to strike. Playing a fish off a direct drive reel is a lot of fun. Just like premium fly reels, premium centre pin reels go for a lot of money.

Almost 30 years ago Canadian steelheaders dug out their old Aerials, etc and found they were a great way to present baits to steelhead. The technique spread to New York streams and is now pretty common for Great Lakes steelheaders. The last few years guys who learned centre pinning up on the steelhead streams are taking those techniques to large trout and smallie rivers, like the Delaware, and are doing great.

A lot of controversy. First, a good centre pinner can present a perfect dead drift and is deadly. A lot of jealousy with fly guys, even if the pinners are using flies or jigs. The second is an etiquette issue. A center pinner can drift a bait 50 yards or more and cover a pool from head to tail in a single drift, which is fine if you are all alone. However, on some heavy pressured streams novice pinners will float their bobbers right across every one else's lines (and I have seen pinners drift their lines over everyone else's heads). I think this will work out over time.


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 Post subject: Centre pin?
PostPosted: 30 Sep 2008, 06:10 • # 12 
Guide
Joined: 08/28/07
Posts: 101
Jeff, welcome to fiberglassflyrodders.
Thanks for further educating us on centre pin fishing.
Tom


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 Post subject: Centre pin?
PostPosted: 30 Sep 2008, 06:16 • # 13 
Administrator
Joined: 01/10/06
Posts: 6270
Location: Holly Springs, NC
JeffK,

Welcome to the Fiberglass Flyrodders!

I've never actually seen someone center pinning, let alone had an issue sharing a stream. I must admit, it looks like it would be more fun than high stick nymphing.

Tom


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 Post subject: Centre pin?
PostPosted: 01 Oct 2008, 00:23 • # 14 
Master Guide
Joined: 09/29/08
Posts: 432
Location: US-NJ
Thanks for the welcome!

Although mostly a fly guy, I do cane pole, spin, bait casting, fish with old 8' to 12' bait rods, and even squeeze in a little centre pinning. Centre pinning is pretty enjoyable since it is one of those simple (with plenty of tricks to learn) but effective styles of fishing. My Canadian acquaintances say that it is one of the old forms of fishing that was once common in Britain and Canada, but was neglected in the run to spinning tackle. It is now having a resurgance. I have seen a few US guys do it with a spinning reel or free running bait caster, which is a good way to try it with tackle you may have already without coughing up the bucks for a centre pin reel, which can be pricy.


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 Post subject: Centre pin?
PostPosted: 01 Oct 2008, 04:28 • # 15 
Sport
Joined: 06/12/05
Posts: 49
Location: US-MT
Does the Windex reel by J.W. Young qualify as a centre-pin reel?


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 Post subject: Centre pin?
PostPosted: 01 Oct 2008, 04:38 • # 16 
Piscator
Joined: 08/10/05
Posts: 13144
Location: downtown Bulverde, Texas
not quite, it's more of a "mooching" reel - a line holder for bait fishing or trolling
Image

the centrepin is going to be the Rapidex or Trudex
Image


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 Post subject: Re: Centre pin?
PostPosted: 26 Mar 2012, 07:41 • # 17 
Sport
Joined: 02/19/12
Posts: 25
Location: Hertfordshire , England
Here in England there are anglers who get really quite emotional about centre pin reels. Trotting a bait down river( letting it drift under a float with the current ) for Chub or Barbel , both hard fighting river fish , at one time looked to be a dying artform. However, in the last few years there has been a strong revival with the result that some beautifully crafted reels are still being made. None are cheap , typically $300- $400 for a current J.W.Young & Sons item - but they are beautiful and will outlive us all and our children!

A little more affordable are Okumas range which look really nice whenever I see them in my local tackle dealers store - which caters for a lot of hardcore Barbel fishermen. Here they are priced from around £120 , I guess around $180-$ 200.

I use an old J.W.Young 4" Rapidex that I bought off E-Bay eighteen months ago for £20 or about $30. I do not fish for Chub or Barbel myself. Instead I am a determined Pike ( Northern)man. I love drifting a sprat deadbait on small rivers and canals using a single size 6 Eagle Claw treble hooked just below the dorsel fin on an 18inch 20lb seven strand wire trace suspended below a small slip float , using 20lb Tuf-line XP braid mainline and an old 10ft. Normark glass rod rated for 15-50 gram weights. I guess my old Rapidex is at least forty, maybe fifty , years old but it gives line very smoothly in the most moderate of currents really allowing me to search out a lot of water. 5-6 lb Pike are good fun on this outfit and it is a style of fishing I enjoy occasionally as a change from casting lures.


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